What scares you? Sitting around a campfire swapping ghost stories? Monster films? Horror comics? How about sneaking into a supposedly haunted building and having a look around? What do you do if you meet that thing that scares you?

I was left at the end of Nailbiter Returns #8 with a big question mark. The creators made a decision that could have sent the story spiraling off the tracks and into a ravine, but I’m happy to say that they wisely used a McGuffin to dig further into the past and who the characters are. I am also happy to report that writers Williamson and Henderson pushed further into a realm that I was hoping they would have explored in the original Nailbiter series: the supernatural.

After the events of “Blue Sun Rising,” we flash forward an unspecified period of time, post-Serenity film. There are hints here that much (if not all) of Dark Horse Comics' Serenity stories have been absorbed into canon here; however, the crew is not where we previously left them, suggesting some major fallouts off-page. Without getting into spoilers, suffice it to say that there are plenty of surprising revelations within these 22 pages.

Jeff Lemire’s Colonel Weird: Cosmagog, an extension of the Black Hammer universe, was made all the more enjoyable by the inclusion of one of my favorite artists, Tyler Crook. His painterly skills create a lush universe for the larger-than-life characters like Anti-God which is a breathtaking monstrosity under his care. His earthy palette follows Weird through his life, bouncing around from one time period to another as he tries to find the missing piece to a comic puzzle that leaves him vulnerable to his own madness. How would you react to knowing how everything was supposed to work out, but knowing that you had to make sure it all happened, the good and the bad.

Why? That is the question that has been coming up for me in the last handful of issues of this series. As readers, we now know how the monsters that kill children and terrorize small towns appear, but why? I feel that there may be a deeper psychological answer that Tynion and Dell’edera will leave up to us to figure out. On the other hand, if they end up giving us a clear-cut answer, I won’t complain.

What does the future hold for the human race? How does our society evolve in the decades ahead? If you are looking for a satirical take on our lives as told in a sci-fi setting, Universe! from Image Comics may just be for you.

Quick recap: Rose is now part of a story, having stepped in as Gawain. A lead from a dying previous associate of Mary/Elaine/Nimue’s sent Bridgette and Duncan back to the old family home. Meanwhile, Rose comes face to face with the woman at large… and a Glock.

“… but of all our tenets, the Final Law is the most sacrosanct.  For we all know Hancock’s Seventh Law…”
“A SCOUT’S HONOR MUST NEVER BE IN QUESTION.”

My first two reviews of Crossover were about the importance of this series, especially in this day and age. It is about how we treat people that are different than us, and it’s a spin on the social and allegorical leanings of the X-Men.

The first issue of Home Sick Pilots gave us an interesting setup for a haunted house story. A punk band consisting of three high schoolers ends up in a house, looking for a badass place to have a concert that will completely destroy the popularity of a rival punk band. The rumors of it being a haunted house turn out to be true, and as both bands face off, it comes to life and terrible things happen. But, wait! There’s more.

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