FanFiction logo*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


Throughout the internet, there is a vast array of writings that are made by those who are dedicated to their subject matter, people who enjoy both creating an extension of established continuity for several franchises, as well as creating completely unthought of combinations for the pure sake of just having it done.  People of all ages, backgrounds, and writing skills work for long periods of time—sometimes as long as an hour—to create enjoyment for others.  These people are many, diverse, and relatively unknown in the grand scheme of things.  They are the ones who write fanfiction.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

Comics random charactersWhile I am relatively new to major mainstream comics, I have still spend a good many years reading various titles due to fanboy giddiness; however, there has always been another aspect of comics that I’ve read in a much more comprehensive, perhaps even obsessive, capacity over the years.  Print comics are nice, and very colorful, but the main problem was that I could never get enough of them to entertain me on a regular basis, and as one knows, when one is bored, they end up surfing the Internet with reckless abandon.  During such an endeavor, I came upon one (of many) entertaining medium that has since stuck with me: web comics.

 

 

Marvel*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

Both Marvel and DC have their main shared universe in which the majority of their characters reside, but they also have separate worlds in which other versions of their characters exist.  The most widely talked about alternative world is that of the Marvel Ultimate universe, in which characters have been introduced in a drastically different manner from their original incarnations.  But, what is it that really appeals about the Ultimate universe that makes people (such as myself and my co-conspirator, Kristine Chester) read it moreso than the main universe?  Well, it’s because there is a dramatic difference between the Ultimate line and the "normal" line; the Ultimate line doesn’t have decades upon decades of comics that have forced the direction of its storytelling.


MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

Star Wars vs. Star Trek*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

Throughout my life and time in geekdom, I’ve come upon several people who have wanted to divide geeks into two camps: those who enjoy Star Wars, and those who enjoy Star Trek.  And, even within those divisions, more divisions have occurred: which Trek series is the best, which Star Wars trilogy is better, which books are more enjoyable to read, etc.  It is as though people feel the need to belong to a certain subgroup in order to find acceptance—heck, even the term geek has come to mean a clique in the past few years.  Well, as someone who is both a Star Trek AND a Star Wars fan, I’m going to tell you just which one is better: they’re both awesome, and they both suck.

MINOR HISTORICAL SPOILERS BELOW

 

Drew Carls JrUPDATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

 
 
The Fanboy Comics staff is happy to report that Drew Siragusa, after his unfortunate Spider-Man incident (as described below), successfully received his free burger from Carl's Jr.®, which was happily documented in the Facebook gallery here.  Thank you to Carl's Jr.® for their kindness and generosity to Drew.



UPDATED AS OF JULY 25, 2012

 
 
On July 23, 2012, shortly after this article went live, Carl's Jr. contacted Fanboy Comics and provided an email contact who will work with FBC staff member Drew Siragusa to acquire the burger he is owed. FBC thanks Carl's Jr. for their efforts to correct this issue and also thanks Spider-Man for once again fighting crime, whether wearing red or black.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Dear Carl's Jr.,


When I first heard about your recent “Dress as Spider-Man and receive a free Grilled Cheese Bacon Burger” promotion, I was very excited. As a life-long fan of Spider-Man and an ingester of cheeseburgers, I felt like this promotion was made for me; however, I was extremely disappointed as my visit to Carl's Jr. took a turn for the worse.

 

BBComic 0112As the Managing Editor of Fanboy Comics, I have the distinct honor and privilege to work with amazingly talented individuals throughout geek culture: actors, writers, artists, directors, photographers . . . the list is endless.  It is always a pleasure to learn more about their craft and to follow their artistic endeavors throughout various stages of the creative process.  Needless to say, when the opportunity arose to work with one such industry professional on a comic book-themed photo shoot, I jumped at the chance!

 

Bunker - Teen Titans*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


I’ve noticed a bit of a trend lately, one that is both positive and negative, and that’s the inclusion of more gay characters within comic books.  I have nothing against such an inclusion—in fact, I fully support it and want there to be more positive models—but the thing that’s really gotten to me is that some of these characters are being created specifically to be the “token” gay character in a title, just as how some African-American characters were created just so the publishers could be shown as being “inclusive.”  Once again, I don’t have a problem with diversity within comics—I wholeheartedly applaud it—but I don’t want characters being created for the wrong reasons, and with a personality type that just screams “being drawn gay (for pay).”


MINOR SPOILER WARNING

 

Superman Blue 1It’s said that we look back on the past with rose-colored glasses; I’m not entirely sure what that is supposed to mean, but those would have turned the subject of this article purple, so that’s fun.  I’m always quick to tell people that I was actually a fan of the time Superman turned into a bright blue energy dude, but that was fifteen years ago. Lately, it’s been coming up a lot, so I thought I would put my money where my mouth is by sitting down with 11-year-old me and re-reading all of my comics featuring “Superman Blue.” Also, the red one. How did it hold up? What new discoveries were made? How is this even possible? Read on.

(For those of you who are fussy about details, the issues I read are: The Adventures of Superman #545-6, 555; Action Comics #732,742; Superman: Man of Steel #67, 77; Superman #123, 132; Superman Red/Superman Blue #1; and JLA: Secret Files and Origins #1)

 

 

HeroclixHe floats by the fountain in the desolate park, waiting. His allies are gone, systematically taken out . . . it all happened so fast. First, the young man in the alien suit who called himself Spider-Man, followed by Aztek, the Ultimate Man. Thrown together by fate, they were not destined to fight together for long. No, now it is only Superman. Silently, he curses these strange new energy-based abilities. If he had his old, familiar powers, perhaps, he could have saved them . . . perhaps he would have stood a chance. Perhaps.

 

DC-ComicsDear DC Comics:



I just wanted to let you know I am very disappointed. Last year, around this time, you announced your New 52 initiative. There was worry, speculation, anger, but mostly you got what you wanted: everyone was talking about DC Comics. Then, we started to get images, announcements of creative teams, and first covers, and an ice cold ball of dread started to form in the pit of my stomach. You see there was something sorely lacking. Something that had been lacking in comics for years, that I had hoped you would finally address.

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