Clue has been a series that should not end. Yes, the premise is such that the narrative will end because of how things are done with Clue. Yet, the storytelling and characterizations of all of the people in the story have been great. There have been no problems whatsoever with anything happening within the story. What is truly notable is exactly how Paul Allor (writer) and Nelson Daniel (artist) were able to take the story from a classic film and turn it into an amazing series that not only stays true to the original film but makes it modern, so it doesn't seem out of place for today's audiences.



Have you ever passed someone on a poorly lit street and felt unsettled, but familiar? A wash of emotion wisps by in an instant, while faint memories echo through your mind. A complete stranger, minding their own business, and suddenly you're aware of them. Personally. Perhaps in the past or in an afterlife that no longer exists you knew that person, and that person is real. You can feel it in your racing heart and the cold marrow of your bones. And you smile. That stranger was just an old colleague that you've not seen in a long while that could have been kept longer if you had only let good enough be. An old colleague whose business is you.

If you haven’t been reading The Damned, you should be. If you haven’t been reading anything by Cullen Bunn, you should read it all. With The Damned, he takes his love of horror mythology and places it in the world of 1930s gangsters. In this world, demons are gang lords in bowlers, and dames sell their souls just to make it by. In the middle of all this is a cursed man, Eddie, who’s mixed up in this world in a big way. His best friend has stolen a key from some important demons to free his love from being cursed. Will Eddie help them or help his best interests?

Mark London, writer of Battlecats and Midnight Task Force, is back with a new comic book series published by Mad Cave Studios. Artist Mauricio Villarreal and letterer Christian Ospina join London, and the trio make up the creative team for Knights of the Golden Sun. Inspired by the Bible, Knights of the Golden Sun is an epic adventure of good versus evil.  

The X-Files: JFK Disclosure #1 proves to be one of the best comic book stories that anyone will read this year. Not only is it filled with intrigue and suspense, there's a great deal of the whole JFK conspiracy tying into the backstories of the two famed protagonists of the series: Mulder and Scully. If you like both of the characters, there's a great deal of pathos given to the characters, as well as utilizing the story of what happened to America's 35th US president.



How can Eric maintain his self-image of a good man while going down the trail of vengeance? He wants the Devil Marauders dead for what they did to his mentor and the students at the karate academy, but if he kills, won’t he be as bad as his enemies? However, if he can convince someone else (or several someones) to do the deed, Eric’s hands will (mostly) be clean.  The animosity between rival gangs is a powerful thing, and it doesn’t take much to ignite it.

This volume is stellar. Adam Knave and D.J. Kirkbride have created an exciting, modernized version of the legendary tales of King Arthur, and Nick Brokenshire has illustrated a 21st-century icon in Rani as an ordinary, young, half-Indian woman who becomes a powerful, punk heroine with a perfect crown hairstyle. This volume exudes energy, and the characters are vivacious and inspiring - the perfect specimens of modern-day heroics.

The season finale is here for Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 11 with the release of issue #12. Telling a shorter and more focused story than previous seasons, the last year has seen some of the best work yet from writer Christos Gage and artist Rebekah Isaacs. In a season clearly reflecting (or perhaps, given the advanced schedule of comic book production, anticipating) the culture and mood of current times, Buffy and company have faced bigotry, internment camps, politicians who are an utter disappointment, and more over the last eleven issues. This final issue of the season instead sees the Scooby Gang on offense against their oppressors and demonstrates, as the Radio Head song goes, “This is what you get when you mess with us.”

You ever have one of those days where everything is going your way? A free place to hang your hat, no worries about food (or more importantly beer), and your trusty 18-wheel steed is ready to roll at a moment's notice? Me neither. That's the way your old pal Jack Burton started his day. At the top. But as they say, it can only goes downhill from there. And you know what Ol' Jack Burton says at a time like this? Aw hell, lemme tell you.

In the blink of an eye, life can forever be altered with the eternal click of social media. No. 1 with a Bullet astutely captures segments of the real world by identifying moments in the life of main character, Nash Huang, where privacy conceptually doesn’t coincide with an online presence. It’s a relevant question in today’s society: Where do we draw the line with regards to people’s privacy, as we further technological advancements? In even simpler terms, are people allowed to have a conversation, even online, and expect a certain level of privacy, or decency, when being responded to?

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