Star Wars Adventures #1 is a mixed bag. Writer Cavan Scott tells two very different stories that do not seem to have much in common, as they are different and are not about the same characters. The first story is very much the writer telling the same tale as the one found in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. This proves to be the stronger of the two stories for its consistency of voice and interesting story it plots. Most Star Wars fans know the scavenger, Rey, who they came across in Episode VII.

If you’re reading this review to try to decide whether or not to read Mark Millar’s original Kingsman: The Secret Service comic, chances are it’s because (much like me) you’ve seen and loved the movie. This means your main question will likely be, “How does the comic compare to the movie?” And the answer is… pretty well.

In 2014, The Evil Within video game was released to gamers who didn’t know what to expect. Touted as one of the scariest games since Silent Hill and the original Resident Evil games, The Evil Within shattered the horror barriers with an acid trip-like journey through a mind-bending world filled with creatures that created more than their fair share of nightmares. With the highly anticipated upcoming release of The Evil Within 2 on October 13, 2017, a comic series has never been better timed. But, with this, The Evil Within: The Interlude #1 (Titan Comics) has its work cut out for it to try to stand up to one of the best video games in years.

It’s here!  The day has finally arrived!  Sure, it’s the first day of September, and who the heck knows where the rest of the year went so quickly, but it’s also…

Right from the beginning of this anthology, writer/creator Corey Lewis admits that his brain can be kind of all over the place. Sun Bakery is his attempt to collect the projects that have arisen from those rather scattered thoughts, all in one place. The result is a number of strange and surreal worlds that don’t always make sense, but are nonetheless entertaining.

I hesitate to call this a Steampunk story, as purists will note that its 1920s setting is a little late to qualify; however, it certainly has many of the elements of Steampunk, as well as a similar overall sense of fun and adventure. Whatever you call it, it’s brilliant and entertaining.

Fred Van Lente, Ryan Dunlavey, and Adam Guzowski’s The Comic Book History of Comics: Birth of a Medium is a treatise on the place of comics as an important part of the fabric of American popular culture. Readers who are familiar with American history and culture may catch that Birth of a Medium is a citation of D. W Griffith’s early American film, Birth of a Nation, but non-American readers (like me!) may not get the reference and may be surprised at the American-centric nature of this text. Though I do think that readers will want to be aware that Birth of a Medium doesn’t offer a comprehensive account of the rise of comics as a medium globally, I count the extreme focus of the text as a positive; Lente and Dunlavey are excellent historians of American comics, and they’ve produced a detailed and relatively balanced text on that topic.

Ghostbusters 101 #6 concludes a major plot point from the beginning of the series. It seems to end the dimensional rift that is causing the two universes of the old Ghostbusters and more recent Ghostbusters team to come together. Seeing them interact within this comic gives the reader the chance to fully understand the scope of everything. Dr. Ray Stantz is leading the troops out in the streets in order to fight the ghost trapped between the two universes, linking them together.



After a delay, Joelle Jones’ Lady Killer throttles into the final act with Issue #5 of the second series, leaving the door open for a third. Freaking exciting in all regards!

Being back in the world of Alex De Campi's Bankshot is a good feeling, though not one I've yet to fully understand. After last issue, we saw Marcus King - and how he became the unstoppable force he is - repaired by a controversial and dangerous science after being shot in the back and left for dead. Paralyzed, he was given a second chance and the ability to walk again, with some upgrades. Now, he fights for himself, with both the American government and his biggest adversary, a man known as the Dutchman, out to stop him. The only problem is that this is harder to gauge than is preferred.

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