Killing Hope is the story of Hope, a young Native American woman fleeing her reservation after everyone she meets begins trying to kill her.

S—t, allow me to introduce Fan.

With Flak gone and Davey running the show, we return to the prize jewel of the mighty, bloated, and downward-sliding empire, NeoTokyo.  Having reduced its natural splendor to a glaring, glittering nightmare, the march of the technology has finally covered the world.  With her loss recent in her mind and her body dealing with the fallout of that encounter, as well, it's time for all the chips to be laid out in this penultimate issue.

The epic pairing of multiple Eisner Award-winning writer Ed Brubaker and Eisner Award-winning artist Sean Phillips, on the heels of their well-received limited series, The Criminal, really went dark with their latest offering from Image, Kill or Be Killed.  The pair, who have won Eisners separately and together, were joined by colorist/cover artist Elizabeth Breitweiser to create the story of anti-hero Dylan,whose tumble into self-loathing turns him into an avenging angel.

Well, sorta.

So, this is the end.

Stephen Hawking has warned that Singularity is coming, the defining moment where - if we continue to pursue AI - it will gain consciousness and propagate at a prodigious rate and basically follow its course of logic to become Ultron.  Apocalypse by machine has been the basis of some great cyberpunk stories, most noticeably in The Matrix Trilogy, but Jordan Hart has added a new wrinkle to the trope: a man whose actions have placed him outside of society to begin with is now the last vestige of that society.  When the machines took over, they left the artists - humans who could create something that the machines knew that they could not - and kept them to keep creating for the machines.

I jumped right into the newly released Torchwood #1 from Titan Comics with absolutely no preparation.  It’s been awhile since I visited the intrepid Cardiff Torchwood Three crew, so I’ll admit right up front that I was very happy to immediately encounter a “Previously on Torchwood” page as I opened the issue.

Writer, artist, and graphic designer Mickey Lam first made his mark as an independent comic book creator with the quirky Mr. Yang Fights Aliens.  For indie creators and especially multi-hyphenate indie creators, it takes time to develop, create, and produce new works, which is why it is so wonderful to see those creators return with exciting, new projects.  Lam has done exactly that this year with the release of his all-ages adventure comic, Fwendly Fwuit: Winter Wonders, and the new comic is an adorable and fun read for young audiences to enjoy.

Since Jonesy first began, one of the most interesting characters has been Jonesy’s secret crush, Stuff. A teen pop sensation with an odd sci-fi persona, he’s thus far been mainly in the background - talked about and seen in video clips, rather than appearing directly. Until now. In this issue, we finally get to meet the legendary Stuff.

In case you missed my review of Spectrum #0, here’s a short synopsis of everything you need to know to understand Spectrum’s place in the macro-verse of Con Man and Firefly.

Mark Millar has written some of the most unforgiving and violently brutal comics out there. From the awesome Old Man Logan to the pop culture-infused Kick Ass, his books have a visceral edge to them. He was one of the weekly targets of internet outrage a while back due to his brutality. To prove his naysayers wrong, he began delving into other arenas and proved he didn’t need to depict immense violence in his story to make it dramatically potent. He’s largely succeeded. I like Millar’s work, and, sometimes, I even love it.

The Hunt - created, written, and illustrated by Colin Lorimer - is a horror story that is a little off the beaten path, and I don’t just mean its Irish locale.

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