Star Wars Rebels continues to excel in its amazing storytelling through Season 3. As a fan of a galaxy far, far away, I’m always looking for different avenues that might be acceptable for my kids to watch (either now or once they’re a little older). The third season of Rebels drives home some valuable lessons that anyone can take away, which continues to expand upon why #StoriesMatter for all ages. Beyond the idea of connecting with characters and seeing oneself in similar situations, Star Wars excels at conveying positive messages and, honestly, really bad “bad guys.”

Do you love cats? Detective stories?  Space operas? Then, Pet Noir has all that and more.  This all-ages comic based on the novel by Pati Nagle follows the adventures of the genetically engineered feline Leon.

If nothing else, I know that I’m never going to go wrong with a release from BOOM! Studios, but I’m still consistently caught off guard by the quality of their showings. Their most recent is Eve, an obvious reference to the Biblical story. Taking place not terribly far in the future, we are introduced to a girl and her father who have a job to do - a mission one might say - that Eve is just about to learn about. When a twist occurs in the story, we realize that maybe Eve isn’t where we thought she was (or never has been) and the circumstances are far worse. An android that looks like an old, mangled teddy bear named Wexler becomes her introduction to this new reality, and the adventure truly begins.

Wynd is on the run. With him is his best friend who is basically a sister, a prince who is fleeing his father (the King), and the prince’s gardener turned bodyguard. The first issue found them outrunning the Bandaged Man, a person who could smell magic, and since Wynd is magical, he stayed hot on their trail.

“Between the Panels” is a bi-weekly interview series focusing on comic book creators of all experience levels, seeking to examine not just what each individual creates, but how they go about creating it.

Nocterra has been a high-energy story right from the start, and that doesn’t change at all in Scott Snyder and Tony S. Daniel’s newest issue of their creator-owned work. We begin issue #3 right where we left off, with Val and company on the run from Black Bill.

Fanbase Press Contributor Phillip Kelly plays and reviews a handful of brand new independent video games, all costing no more than $25. Why?  There are a lot of indie games out there, and if he can help you, curious reader, to parse through the selection with even a little more knowledge, then, by god, he’ll die content.

The ambitious, new Chinatown noir from writer Pornsak Pichetshote and artist Alexandre Tefenkgi takes a measured first step, but leaves a lasting impression. The Good Asian #1 is more than just a gripping mystery and meticulously researched historical fiction, it's a thoughtful examination of identity and timely reflection of modern anxieties in the Asian-American community.

One of the most difficult things about growing up is living up to the examples of our heroes. Parents, mentors, and others can unwittingly create barriers for the generations that follow. This was the premise of the Flash comic book in the 1990s in which Wally West tried desperately to live up to Barry Allen’s ideals. This is also the premise of Dark Horse’s new series, Jenny Zero.

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