Tales from the Darkside is the more obscure Tales from the Crypt for those that don’t remember the mid to late 1980s. The horror anthology was created by George Romero in 1983 and ran until 1990, spawning Crypt and other impersonators and a feature film. A few years ago, a potential revival was pitched, and Joe Hill was brought in to work on the first five episodes. Hill’s work and family attachment to the project (His father contributed several stories to the show and to the film.) made him the obvious choice. While the project never got off the ground, IDW decided to partner with Hill again and bring those scripts to the still-passionate Locke & Key fans. Despite the best “graphic novel” treatment, it’s difficult for the story to not feel like you’re reading a half-baked film treatment.

Brian Haberlin’s telling a story I’ve been looking for for years: science fiction full of exploration and discovery, grounded in a clear interest in real(ish) science, more about the ship, its crew, and the things they encounter than blowing up bad guys. I mean, there are bad guys, and existential threats, and action…but, like in the best eras of Star Trek, these are there to heighten the drama – obstacles to overcome. They raise the stakes. They aren’t the point. There’s an inherent optimism and exceptionalism to it (again, much like Star Trek, to which Haberlin makes overt references on numerous occasions), and when the majority of science fiction offerings in popular culture have been focused on deadly aliens and laser swords for a number of years, Faster Than Light feels like coming home again.

Well, the Cubbies were off by a year of winning the World Series according to Back to the Future, but at least they finally won!  In this day and age, however, you know director Robert Zemeckis and producer Steven Spielberg can release a special edition where Marty goes to the future of 2016 instead of 2015.

Forget everything you think you know.

So speaks the Ancient One to Mister...forgive me, Dr. Strange.  It's also a good reminder for the audience, as well, though judging by my theatre, everyone was ready for a new kind of trip.  Marvel's doing something hard, something almost more difficult than tossing RDJ into a powered suit and seeing what shakes out.  They have to build it again, but in a world where we already have so many pieces and a comfortable sense of what's happening.  The success and shine of Winter Soldier and Civil War have spoiled us with solidly continuing storylines that have built upon everything that came before, with Ant Man and Doctor Strange opening up new worlds (the Quantum Realm and, well, the entirety of the multiverse, respectively) that are harder to ground in reality.  The only current franchise that has attempted that has been Thor, and it's not an uncommon belief that those films tend to be the weakest of the offerings we've have over the last decade.  This is the ground that Marvel has to win to bring Infinity Wars to the screen, and, honestly, Phase 3 looks to be shaping up pretty well.

In anticipation of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings trilogy, four fans were inspired to create a website that they aptly called The One Ring (TORn). It started as a basic, informational landing page with a message board in which fans could discuss all-things Tolkien. Although the LoTR and Hobbit films have faded with time, it does not mean that the fandom surrounding them has subsided. Cliff Boardway moderated the Saturday, October 29th, panel “Tolkien Fandom: The Road Goes Ever On” and was joined by fellow Tolkien enthusiasts that included Josh Rubenstein, Cathy Udovch, and Nancy Steinman.

On the last morning of Stan Lee’s Los Angeles Comic Con, a small audience group gathered for the “From Wonder Woman to Elektra: How are Women Characters Represented?” panel which was moderated by Jessica Tseang (Little Geek Girl). Joining her were Ify Nwadiwe (Krillin It with Dani and Ify), Dani Fernandez (Krillin It with Dani and Ify), Barbra Dillon (Editor-in-Chief, Fanbase Press), and Steven L. Sears (Xena: Warrior Princess, Sheena).

What would you and your high school classmates do if you, and your school building, were suddenly transported to an unknown world? What would you do if you were surrounded by a wilderness filled with terrifyingly grotesque creatures that want to devour your flesh?

Wow - that is a whopper of a second issue!  I was expecting something decent, but I wasn’t prepared for something that good.

Moderator Russell Nohelty (founder, Wannabe Press) posed the question: How do you build an audience when you don’t have a product to sell? To answer that question, Nohelty assembled a handful of creators that included Bryant Dillon (Fanbase Press President and Co-Founder), Lynly Forrest (HexComix Producer), Neo Edmund (author of A Tale of Red Riding: Rise of the Alpha Huntress), Joie Brown (writer/artist of Heavenly Kibble Guardian Corgi), and Mom (organizer of the Los Angeles Women’s Comic Creator Group - a.k.a. The Ladybugs).

David Leach is at it again!  Who is David Leach, you ask?  Why, just look at this review (by Yours Truly) to learn a little bit about him.  Anywho, though it might have taken him over two years to publish the next edition of Psycho Gran, this edition (volume 2!) does not disappoint.  For those of you who are really ready to watch some vigilantes kick the ever-loving crap out of some jerk on the street who has it coming, this comic is for you.

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