Frankenstein and his creator, Mary Shelley, are an indelible part of western culture.  So much so that horror stories written by other Victorian women have been overshadowed.  Fortunately for us, Kymera Press has dug into the past and searched out horror stories by Victorian women that had been lost until now.  

“Between the Panels” is a bi-weekly interview series focusing on comic book creators of all experience levels, seeking to examine not just what each individual creates, but how they go about creating it.

As long as there are kids who love to be scared, R.L. Stine will be there, lurking in the shadows with his latest creations. Though I was just a few years older than his intended audience, I devoured his Fear Street books and later Goosebumps, all while wishing he’d published them several years earlier to scare me to sleep alongside my Stephen King novels.

I’m embarrassed to admit this: While I’ve owned every issue of Mind MGMT, this is the first time I’ve read what is now the third omnibus in the collection. I have no logical or tangible reason as to why I haven’t. The good news is that now my reaction to the third omnibus isn’t me reflecting on something I read three years ago. This is fresh in my mind, still bouncing around up there.

Jeff Lemire is not letting the library of DC superheroes go unused in his Black Hammer / Justice League: Hammer of Justice. More and more characters begin to pop up in the series, and they all have very distinct styles of dealing with the villain who is revealed in this issue.

On the Night Border is a collection of fifteen horror short stories by New York-based writer James Chambers. The stories within the collection are a mixture of previously published stories and ones appearing for the very first time. The tones and subgenres of the stories vary, from ghost tales (“Lost Daughters”) to possession (“Marco Polo”) to rich folks who have a dark, evil side to them (“The Many Hands Inside the Mountain” and “Picture Man”). Some stories dabble in other universes and IPs, such as Cthulhu Mythos-compatible stories (“A Song Left Behind in the Aztakea Hills,” “Odd Quahogs”), Lin Carter’s Anton Zarnak (“A Wandering Blackness”), Robert W. Chambers’ The King in Yellow (“The Chamber of Last Earthly Delights”), and even '70s cult classic Kolchak the Night Stalker (“Kolchak the Night Stalker: The Lost Boy”).

The following is an interview with actor/writer Rider Strong and producer Andrew Carlberg regarding the currently running production of Never Ever Land through Theatre Unleashed. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Strong and Carlberg about the inspiration behind the play, their shared creative process in working with the cast and crew, what they hope that audiences will take away from the production, and more!

The following is an interview with Stephanie Phillips, writer of the upcoming comic book series, The Butcher of Paris, from Dark Horse Comics. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Phillips about the inspiration behind the series, her creative process in working with artist Dean Kotz, colorist Jason Wordie, letterer Troy Peteri, and cover artist Dave Johnson, what she hopes that readers will take away from the story, and more!

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

The Twilight Zone has been cited by countless writers and directors as a major influence in television and the science fiction genre as a whole. For the past 50 years, its eerily poignant messages have remained relevant in the social and political worlds. But for its popularity, the man behind the project remains mostly a mystery. Rod Serling, a face any fan of the show could place, carefully crafted an image as an impartial observer, but who was he when the lights went off? The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television seeks to shine a light on the life of television's “angry young man.”

Page 6 of 312
Go to top