Upon reading Compass the first time through, one can feel that it’s steeped in history; the details about the places and people don’t feel made up (and, in many instances, they are not), but it’s also steeped in the love of Indiana Jones, The Mysterious Cities of Gold, and other adventures rooted in the joy of discovery. And in the notes following the story, the writers - Robert Mackenzie and David Walker - make specific reference to Mysterious Cities of Gold, also a show I grew up on!

I’m not even sure how to catch anyone up on what’s happening in Ultramega, and that’s honestly pretty wonderful. This is like nothing else out there right now. It’s a Kaiju story that isn’t concerned at all about pandering to tropes. It’s barely concerned about giving us a hero’s journey, and it’s pulling off avoiding that in the most spectacular way (in spades).

Quick recap so far: Seeking a reprieve and some medical help, Zoë and her crew arrive at the doorstep of one Simon Tam and Kaylee. (They have kids!) Despite Zoë’s misgivings, Simon’s sleuthing about the mysterious cargo gets them the wrong kind of notice. Meanwhile, Emma and Lu have run off with the Blue Sun contraband.  

What is violence? What does power do to a person? Growing up in the '80s desensitized me to violence in a big way. Every action and horror film made was all about the death toll. I myself was never a violent person. I’ve never punched anyone, and I don’t ever intend to. As I matured, I began to find that violence could still affect me on an emotional and visceral level, and violence for the sake of violence in many cases became less and less interesting (though, admittedly, I will find the YouTube videos of all of the Mortal Kombat fatalities whenever a new chapter in the series is released). It all started to happen when the realities of how people die or are asked to die became known to me. Sending soldiers overseas to fight and die for … oil, and in the name of freedom, disgusted me.

The following is an interview with B.B. Russell regarding the upcoming release of the YA novel, Kindreds. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Russell about the creative process of bringing this story to life, the importance of providing a perspective on the foster care system in YA literature, and more!

The following is an interview with artist Nicole Goux regarding the upcoming release of the graphic novel, Everyone Is Tulip, from Dark Horse Comics. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Goux about the shared creative process of bringing this story to life with co-creator Dave Baker and colorist Ellie Hall, the inspiration behind the graphic novel, the import that the story may carry for readers, and more!

Throughout 2020, Fanbase Press' weekly Creator Forums provided comics industry professionals with an opportunity to discuss ways to cope with the changing comics landscape in light of the Coronavirus. As a new year begins and the impact of COVID-19 continues, it is not lost on us that comic book conventions - and the opportunity to connect with industry colleagues personally and professionally - will not take place for the foreseeable future. To provide further opportunities to connect with industry creators, publishers, media, retailers, and educators during our collective quarantine, Fanbase Press will be hosting its next Comics & Coffee virtual meetup on Saturday, June 19, 2021, at 10 a.m./PT (1 p.m./EST). Fanbase Press' Comics & Coffee is a FREE hour-long Zoom session taking place every Saturday, welcoming new and experienced comics pros to a virtual meetup that aims to fill the convention-less void with networking opportunities, sharing creative successes and failures, and troubleshooting ways to navigate the industry in the weeks and months to come.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve suddenly been hearing people talk about Ted Lasso over the last few months. Probably not a lot of specifics, just mentions of how good it is, and a few references that you didn’t quite understand. And, if you’re anything like me, you’ve thought to yourself that it sounds like it might be fun, but haven’t watched it, because it’s only available on Apple TV+. (Seriously, who needs—or even can afford—yet another paid streaming service right now?) Well, I’m here to tell you: You need Ted Lasso in your life. And you won’t even realize just how much you needed it, until you’ve seen it for yourself.

Anyone who has ever lived with a young, active cat knows the challenges of getting adjusted to his or her particular quirks.  Will you have to devote two hours after work to playing with a fishing rod toy?  Will kitty only be satisfied by chasing the red dot?  Or is the key to feline happiness the ultimate kitty crack, catnip?  Creator Victoria Douglas presents a slightly fictionalized example of their learning process with their cat in Cinnamon, a slice-of-life tale about the joys and hazards of sharing our homes with a furry overlord.  

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