First things first: The title of this new comic book series is a reference to T.H. White’s The Once and Future King, a not-so-subtle nod at Great Britain’s most famous fictional (?) monarch, King Arthur. Instead of a straight take on the Arthurian legends, Kieron Gillen’s tale sets itself up to be in the vein of the action/adventure genre, much in the tradition of classics like the Indiana Jones saga or, more recently, the Uncharted video game series.

Over the last couple of years, Humanoids has really dug into the comics landscape and expanded its reach, and, in doing so, it’s been nothing but win after win.

Spencer & Locke 2 delivers in such a spectacular way that allows this volume stand on its own, while also further validating the likability of its title characters. The trade paperback for Spencer & Locke 2 is being released this Wednesday, and whether you’re a fan of the first volume or new to the series, this collection is totally worth it.

This is an excellent trade paperback that does justice to the task of capturing the charm, the drama, the storytelling, and the technically brilliant artwork and design that one associates with the Star Blazers legend.  

Abigail wants to be a police officer (just like her dad), but, in the time when this story was set, being a woman prevented many from achieving this goal. One day, Abigail sees a listing hiring police officers at Utopia, a new Hollywood studio. Although the position would be that of a glorified security guard (They're only there to give the place a real-world feel.), Abigail soon sees behind the lights and cameras of the Hollywood, looking right into its corrupted underbelly.

Releasing this Wednesday, August 7, from IDW Publishing is the long-awaited artist edition of Marvel Comics’ Star Wars comic book series that legendary creatosr Walter Simonson and Tom Palmer worked on in the early 1980s.  Scanning the original black-and-white artist pages from Simonson and Palmer’s personal archives and presented at 100% their actual size – that’s 12” x 17” – this edition will be a must-have.  

A quick recap of Issue #6: Xander, having “survived” a botched siring, was in need of a Soul Tie to anchor his soul. Buffy and Willow retrieved one from the Siphon but at a terrible cost: a piece of Willow’s soul.

Greg Pak and Giannis Milonogiannis have something on their mind, which makes their collaboration on Ronin Island that much more successful. Set after the fall of the Shogun, Japan and its surrounding countries have fallen into a sort of post-apocalyptic scenario that we’re just starting to get a handle on.

You ever have one of those days in which just about every little thing can go wrong? It would be hilarious if you weren’t so annoyed. Gil Starx finds himself in that position in issue two of Sea of Stars. This is a space odyssey about a father (Gil Starx) who is a widowed intergalactic trucker and his son Kadyn who has been dragged along on a job. When their rig is split in two by a space leviathan, both are tossed into the cold of space with nothing but their space suits and wits.

“If the world will not have me in it, it cannot have me at all.” ~ Izzy Tyburn

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