Class hierarchy, social status, racial discrimination, and sexual discrimination are all themes being handled deftly in Greg Pak and Giannis Milonogiannis’ Ronin Island.

Empty Man #7 goes above and beyond, shifting from survival horror to something more along the lines of existential and philosophical dread. Not only does Cullen Bunn take what is probably a simple concept and make it mind-bogglingly esoteric in the best way, but what has been to this point a hellish landscape of chaotic, uncontrollable horror chasing down our heroes has become something that you maybe can’t just outrun.

Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston’s meta tale of superheroes without a story has sprawled every which way since its first issue about two years ago. I say “without a story” not because things haven’t happened - so much has happened - but because for much of the series our heroes have been without anything to save. Their story was stripped away from them, and they’ve been forced to live out different stories. What happens when you take away a superhero’s main reason for existing?

Reading She Could Fly is like slipping into someone else’s madness, and it fits far too comfortably.

Welcome to a world where the past, present, and future all echo each other, the paranormal is the only way to understand the normal, and everything happens for a reason. Elizabeth Crowens’ page turner creates wonder and intrigue into the mystical possibilities of everyday life and the ways that decisions shape the future.

I have reservations making the review of Humanoids’ newest Life Drawn title, States of Mind, about me, but, in many ways, the purpose of this graphic novel is to show people that are struggling with depression, bipolar disorder, manic depression, and other mental health disorders that you’re not alone. As someone who can get lost in depressive states, stories like this are good to keep on hand.

Is there anything more intrinsically '90s than Todd McFarlane’s Spawn? It’s perfect. The content is edgy, the art is gritty, and the capes are long as heck. It has been a very long time since Spawn was a hit, but lest we forget, it was a major hit. There was an HBO show along with a feature film and successful cartoon. Impressively enough, Spawn managed to thrive under the umbrella of an independent comic book publisher (Image Comics) which was run by a group of renegade writers and artists, unsatisfied with the deals they were offered at the two major comic book outlets (Marvel and DC).

The second season of American Gods has come to a close with the episode, “Moon Shadow.”  

It’s time to return to Nailbiter and the town of Buckaroo one last time.

Just about every kid in the '90s had some exposure to R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps. The books were wildly successful and even spawned a TV series that Stine occasionally cameoed in. The plots were often simplistic: Kid(s) discover some dangerous/scary secret, shenanigans ensue, good (usually) trumps evil, though often with a twist. That’s your Goosebumps primer.

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