Traveling to Denver to let Dr. Rusted know what happened to his wife and daughter, Honeysuckle survives an attack by the Comet Cult with the help of former MMA fighter Marc DeSpot.  (The Cult thinks she will turn their leader into the FBI since they claim he foretold the deadly rain.)

As I dig into my Kickstarter pile again, I ran across a favorite artist of mine, Edwin Arroza. He’s been doing several indie comics over the last few years, and I always appreciated his style. This time, he came on board Century House, a series from Skeletal Press.

We've reached the end of this first series from Critical Role's latest comics foray, and with it coming to a close, we get a full view of a beautiful story and of the incredible environment that is Exandria and the Kryn Dynasty. With Leylas Kryn, the Bright Queen of the Kryn Dynasty and her partner Quana dealing with the consequences of their journey, it will be up to them to figure out what to do when their child goes through a dangerous transformation.

Things are heating up in Stellar City, dear reader, as our intrepid police detectives, Sawse and Trustah, continue their downward trudge into the heart of the city’s underworld—or if not the heart, at least a kidney. There’s a whole lot of underworld to cover in Stellar City, and the triple homicide they’re investigating is fairly low on the police force’s priority list. Which may just mean it’s the key to everything.

Where the previous issue hinted at Daisy’s origin and destiny, Daisy #4 plunges us deep into the lore of the Nephilim and their cursed children, and the false god that started it all. It’s dark, the imagery is disturbing as all heck, and the central theology of the series comes into sharp focus here.

The following is an interview with writer/editor Madison Estes regarding the release of the horror anthology, Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers Vol. 6, from Death’s Head Press. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Estes about the shared creative process of bringing the collection to life, what readers can anticipate from the stories, and more!

In the final issue of Buffy the Last Vampire Slayer, Buffy is up to her jugular in vampires while Thess and the coven try to jumpstart the sun’s powers again. Sacrifices are made and Buffy’s fate is decided.

Pour a glass of wine, grab a plate of dinner, and bunker down for a murder taking place, right on your computer screen. You’ve entered the world of Auntie Boddy. People regularly die in her presence, and everyone’s a suspect, including you.

Jim Henson’s The Storyteller was a creative and captivating show that did all sorts of strange and wonderful things with fairytales from all different cultures. It put new twists on old tales—some familiar, some less so—and made them come alive as only the Jim Henson Company could. As a fan of all things Henson, as well as all types of folklore, the show was pretty much tailor-made for me. So, needless to say, I was very excited to read and review this new comic.

Coda was one of better comic book experiences I’d run across in some time. It was the first collaboration that I knew of from Si Spurrier and Matías Bergara. They gave me a unique vision. They used the scope of what fantasy could entail to tell a challenging story; it was something like no one else was doing. It was unhinged and yet focused, it was melancholic and yet hopeful, it was thrilling and yet meant something important. When it was done, I wanted more. Since the announcement of Step by Bloody Step, this was the “more,” and - boy howdy - is it even more than I expected.

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