The Battlecats were seasoned warriors in the realm of Valderia, and their reputation as heroes was known far and wide across the kingdom. It came as no surprise that King Eramand III would, therefore, mandate the group of warriors to search out and defeat the Dire Beast, who over many years has been responsible for numerous deaths. As proof of their success, the King requested that the Battlecats present him with the head of the beast. In the first two issues, readers followed the group as they fought a series of ambushes, and, in this third issue, the Battlecats finally face their arch nemesis in the rugged mountains.

Jessi Sheron’s The Evil Queen is more than just a storybook of princesses, queens, kings, curses, and witches. It’s a story about love, beauty, jealousy, and overcoming one’s self-imposed short comings in the face of a world that only cares about beauty. It’s a story about power and those that believe they have the power to tell your story. The journey here is two-fold, both external and internal, as most fairy tales should be.

It’s impossible to talk about this movie without dealing with its considerable baggage, so let’s start unpacking.

I spend a considerable amount of time these days trying to think like a 9-year-old.  This is because I have a 9-year-old tromping around my house, and it’s a very good thing to try to predict what fascinating, new mischief he might be planning.  Actually achieving some precognition in this matter, though, is difficult when the target changes their mind so abruptly. 

Rebirth of the Gangster is a noir comic book series about the children of a group of criminals, specifically, how they relate to their parents’ history and how they interact with that legacy themselves.

Well, that just happened...

The premise behind Caitlin Kittredge (writer) and Steven Sanders’ Throwaways is interesting. The title refers to someone involved in the world of espionage, slang that basically means you’re a dispensable assassin meant to die along with your target(s).

When a soul weeps, it does so with blood.

Rick Remender and Sean Murphy are ramping things up yet again in their tense dystopia. Mr. Flak is dead, but it doesn't spell the end of the trouble that dear Debbie is in for.  Dear, sweet, mad Davey is still in the picture and now without the thin leash of authority on him...

Star Trek turns 50 this year, and though pop culture primarily recognizes Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, and the rest of the Enterprise crew as the progenitors of the long-running franchise, that’s not where it all began.  Star Trek had a very troubled path to television, frequently relying on special interest from influential people like Lucille Ball to get on (and stay on) the air.  Some of this was money, some concern that creator Gene Roddenberry’s vision was too intellectual, and some a result of Roddenberry’s own habits.  Star Trek is relatively rare in that NBC gave it not one shot at a pilot, but two; the second pilot, “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” features Kirk, Spock, and many of the other characters even the most casual Trek viewer would recognize, in addition to many of the series’ tropes.  Before that episode, though, there was the first, rejected pilot, “The Cage,” adapted in this issue by John Byrne in the photo-comic style he’s built up over the course of New Visions.

Is this conundrum still going on?! No.  I’m not talking about the conundrum we call Donald Trump.  That is a conundrum I don’t think any of us will ever figure out. 

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