Kidnapped and with his liver removed, Matt fights for survival, but just when he thinks all is lost, the most unlikely person saves him—Robert. Matt’s former mentor insists the real culprit is Frances, but Matt refuses to believe him. Matt’s mental health is challenged as he keeps having hallucinations of Pamela Wilton and his family, or are they something else? Spirits? His conscience? Added to his anxiety is Matt’s relationship with Robert. Though they once shared a deep friendship, it isn’t enough to convince Matt that Robert is telling the truth. Meanwhile, Ava struggles with her feelings for Matt as Robert re-evaluates his relationship with God. But the real question is, what does all this mean for Matt now that he has a Regenerist liver?

You could almost begin the story of Paleocene with the words, “Once upon a time,” but that would give you the impression this was a fairy tale, and it is not. It is a tale of those animals who survived the end of the world. Not the present world as we know it, but far into the past, when a massive asteroid slammed into the Yucatán peninsula over sixty-six million years ago.

Quick recap: Having found the secret armory of William Shakespeare, our merry band of monster hunters came face to face with Mary’s well-trained scope aimed right at Bridgette.

After a fairly tense last issue, we had Mal coming to terms with his grief and PTSD with Inara by his side, while the rest of the Serenity crew along with the Earthers and Workers had kind of come to a new arrangement.

The rundown: Think Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol with Jayne Cobb as your misguided, possibly misunderstood, and definitely maligned star.

From a first read, Daisy comes across as a supernatural thriller with a solid whack of horror. If you’re a fan of dark apocryphal stories (Think the Bible through the lens of Guillermo del Toro.), this should definitely be on your to-read list. Seemingly at the center of the story is Daisy Phillips, a teenage giant who may be a descendant of the Nephilim, the giant progeny of angels and human women. Much of the first issue is exposition heavy, but it still manages to find its heart in the mystery of a missing child and a mother’s quest to find her.

Set in the not-so-distant future in an alternate universe where the sun has mysteriously lost its potency, Buffy Summers is the last remaining Slayer. With new laws to guarantee that vampires and humans can coexist in harmony, it’s an entirely different world for Buffy, where Slayers are obsolete and on the endangered list. That, and she’s also in her 50s, with her Slayer powers acting all wonky. To add to her heaping plate of troubles, a mysterious teenage girl shows up seeking a very specific brand of assistance.

The Boston Metaphysical Society never disappoints. Madeleine Holly-Rosing seamlessly combines sci-fi with the supernatural to create adventures that are always fun and rarely expected. And Book of Demons is no exception.

In the last issue, a reunion was quickly followed by deteriorating alliance between the Earthers and Kaylee’s group. With tensions running high, things looked like they could get complicated real quick. Unless cooler heads prevailed, that is.

Quick recap: With the Brittonic Arthur calling on all his knights to aid him in his battle against his Norman counterpart, both Duncan (“Percival”) and Rose (“Gawain”) were technically summoned to aid their king and their reluctance to do so wasn’t taken well. After depositing Rose’s parents with the rest of the group at the Grail Castle, it’s off with the merry trio of monster hunters to draw the attention away from the group for their safety. Too bad about the giant that showed up though…

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