Whew! Boy! Holy shit! If you were waiting for Stray Dogs to go full serial killer, then this is the issue. Comic books don’t get that sort of surge of emotions out of a person unless they really, really, really nail the pacing and through that the elevation of intensity, and, well, no one wants to see anything bad happen to dogs.

If you can imagine a Kaiju story as told by David Cronenberg, you’ll get Ultramega. The very first issue taught me to expect the unexpected, and, even with that, the unexpected doesn’t seem to cover everything. While creator James Harrem certainly cares about the characters he’s writing, or at least cares about their depth and complexity, he isn’t reverent to his creations. This is a harsh, weird world with not a single character archetype to safely guide us through it. Every moment of heroic certainty is followed by one of, well, now what?!

This is the same world that Joe Golem, another Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden character, inhabits. It’s a world of witches and alternate time lines. In the case of Cojacaru the Skinner, we have witches allying with the Nazis. The first issue started us in the middle of the action, with a group of allied soldiers trying to get important information to a church without dying.

Ubisoft’s The Far Cry video game series has long been a staple in first-person shooters. Addictive open worlds, highly re-playable missions, and memorable villains are only some of the things that make the games great. But it’s the villains that fans usually demand to see more of. With the latest delay of Far Cry 6 and the possibility of not seeing it until September 2021, gamers are eager to get their hands on anything to pass the time.

The world-famous Magic Manor is filled with glitz, glam, magic, and mayhem – and this one-shot comic brings it all together against the backdrop of Los Angeles with a unique flair of the 1930s.

Stepping into darkness takes courage. Stepping back in?  That way madness lies.

“I’m sorry, Dez… But you can’t build a home upon a lie…
One way or another… This is the end of the line.”

I’ve always been fascinated by the Justice Society of America. The precursor to the Justice League, it featured a number of heroes who have since fallen by the wayside—or taken wildly different forms. Not to mention superheroes against the background of World War II. This film gives us a glimpse into that world, from a modern perspective. It also includes time travel, so, of course, I was excited to review it.

Folklore, mythology, urban legends. These tales, whether whispered over a campfire or imparted to children cowering under their bedclothes, keep imaginations rolling through the generations. Despite the richness of the stories, people tend to focus only on ones in their regions or cultures, leaving behind a plethora of chilling legends that live only in certain areas of the world.

I love history, so when I was approached to read the ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) of an anthology of historical fiction about the interaction of Viking voyagers with Islamic emissaries in the 10th century, I had to say yes. I mean, who doesn’t love Vikings mixing it up with the dynamic and powerful Islamic kingdoms of that time period? I do admit that having a Master’s degree in Arabic and the Cultural History of the Arabs did influence me a bit. But then again, it has Vikings.

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