Mark Millar has written some of the most unforgiving and violently brutal comics out there. From the awesome Old Man Logan to the pop culture-infused Kick Ass, his books have a visceral edge to them. He was one of the weekly targets of internet outrage a while back due to his brutality. To prove his naysayers wrong, he began delving into other arenas and proved he didn’t need to depict immense violence in his story to make it dramatically potent. He’s largely succeeded. I like Millar’s work, and, sometimes, I even love it.

The Hunt - created, written, and illustrated by Colin Lorimer - is a horror story that is a little off the beaten path, and I don’t just mean its Irish locale.

Anyone following my reviews will know that I've already said my piece about every single issue in this limited series, in which I lauded the team on Magekiller for making something pretty great. That being said, when it was time for the trade to hit shelves, I once again jumped at the chance to give this book another shot, especially since I'd be able to read it as a whole and not just in parts from month to month. So, here's another look at Dragon Age: Magekiller, a series so good, I volunteered to review it twice.

The surprise hit of last month (at least for me) has returned with its follow up, and the sophomore issues of Cryptocracy doesn't disappoint.

I know a number of people who, when confronted with any sort of story involving time travel - from Primer to Back to the Future - will say, “I don’t understand time travel stories. They’re confusing.” If this accurately reflects your own attitude towards time travel, then stay far, far away from Past Aways. It will have you scratching your head practically from the first page and only gets more complicated from there; however, if you’re more like me and eagerly devour time-travel fiction in any form you can find, then this is definitely the comic for you. The story is strange and intricately crafted and a whole lot of fun from beginning to end.

Finally! It's that time of the month! Naturally, I'm talking about my monthly visit to my local comic book shop to pick up the latest edition of Lara Croft's adventures, Tomb Raider.

This Christmas, every stocking will be filled with Santa’s foot in your a**.

I’ve always been of fan of people taking myth and using it in new stories. Jim Butcher mostly makes his living doing just that. I really don’t think that any myths are beyond the reach of such treatments, even ones we hold dear today like dear old Saint Nick. I mean, the Robot Santa episodes are some of my favorites in the run of Futurama.  Much like that fun take on the world’s most famous Elf, Sleigher: Heavy Metal Santa Claus from Action Lab: Danger Zone is full of charm, wit, and much, much a**-kicking.  If you wondered what it would be like if The Santa Clause starred Lemmy instead of Tim Allen, this is a book you’re gonna love.

This is it. After nearly three years and three volumes, Velvet #15 marks the end of the storyline. And, how do we open it? With Velvet Templeton, our intrepid hero and rogue agent for lo these three years, lying dead on a slab, as the agent who’s been after her for much of that time relates the story of their final battle.

It looks like the current volume of Think Tank: Creative Destruction is ending with this issue. That is a very sad thing, because this book has been awesome from the very beginning. But even with this shortened volume, it's has been a great series, full of hard facts, rebellious scientists, and awesome technology. It's also showing the not-so-slow destruction of David Loren, one of the most interesting lead characters I've ever seen in a comic book series. He has a genius-level intellect, and he's also a narcissistic jerk who usually tends to only think about what is good for him. Throughout this volume, David has shown some uncharacteristic compassion which has only made things more complicated.

I have a little list.

I mentioned in the last issue review that things we’re awkwardly transitioning from a mostly self-contained story into a long-running series, and there’s a wonderful sight gag in this issue where Skottie Young owns it completely and forges on.  That’s one of the things that I love so much about this series, that much like other fourth-wall shattering heroes (not a hero), this book takes great fun in mocking itself and the medium with a gentle tongue-in-cheekiness that is endearing and a big relief for those who may be a little burned out by the cape and tights set.  He’s providing comic relief for the industry, because while certain tropes can be engaging if done right or turned on their head, for the most par,t they get repetitive. It’s wonderful to watch a keen wit send them up issue after issue.

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