Jeff Lemire’s Colonel Weird: Cosmagog, an extension of the Black Hammer universe, was made all the more enjoyable by the inclusion of one of my favorite artists, Tyler Crook. His painterly skills create a lush universe for the larger-than-life characters like Anti-God which is a breathtaking monstrosity under his care. His earthy palette follows Weird through his life, bouncing around from one time period to another as he tries to find the missing piece to a comic puzzle that leaves him vulnerable to his own madness. How would you react to knowing how everything was supposed to work out, but knowing that you had to make sure it all happened, the good and the bad.

Why? That is the question that has been coming up for me in the last handful of issues of this series. As readers, we now know how the monsters that kill children and terrorize small towns appear, but why? I feel that there may be a deeper psychological answer that Tynion and Dell’edera will leave up to us to figure out. On the other hand, if they end up giving us a clear-cut answer, I won’t complain.

What does the future hold for the human race? How does our society evolve in the decades ahead? If you are looking for a satirical take on our lives as told in a sci-fi setting, Universe! from Image Comics may just be for you.

Quick recap: Rose is now part of a story, having stepped in as Gawain. A lead from a dying previous associate of Mary/Elaine/Nimue’s sent Bridgette and Duncan back to the old family home. Meanwhile, Rose comes face to face with the woman at large… and a Glock.

“… but of all our tenets, the Final Law is the most sacrosanct.  For we all know Hancock’s Seventh Law…”
“A SCOUT’S HONOR MUST NEVER BE IN QUESTION.”

My first two reviews of Crossover were about the importance of this series, especially in this day and age. It is about how we treat people that are different than us, and it’s a spin on the social and allegorical leanings of the X-Men.

The first issue of Home Sick Pilots gave us an interesting setup for a haunted house story. A punk band consisting of three high schoolers ends up in a house, looking for a badass place to have a concert that will completely destroy the popularity of a rival punk band. The rumors of it being a haunted house turn out to be true, and as both bands face off, it comes to life and terrible things happen. But, wait! There’s more.

I feel like I just read another Joker origin story. In Haha #1, we meet Bart, an extremely positive man living a not-so-positive life as a clown. (Yes, this does sound just like the plot to  he DC movie, Joker.) Bart has a wife (who doesn't share his glass-half-full perspective), two kids, and a small dog. The comic does have a few different twists and turns (No spoilers!), plus gorgeous and evocative art by Vanesa Del Rey (Redlands).

“What?  You want me to go live with Zed?!”
“I wish you wouldn’t call him that.  He’s still your dad.”
“But…we barely even see him!”
“He visits for the holidays!”
“Yeah, but weird random holidays that no one here has ever heard of!”
“That’s not true! Panathena is a very big deal in Greece.”
“Really, Mom?!  Panthena?  I don’t think that’s big deal anywhere…”

Ever feel like you never want to stop dancing? Twirling and reeling, the music pushing and pulling you until you realize you're surrounded by other dancers dressed so refined. It's a party the likes of which you've not seen, but heard of in stories of luxury. To call it a simple "ball" would be an insult to organized revelry. No, this gathering holds magic, mystique, and beautiful confusion. The real ball isn't the one you attend, it's where it takes place. As was said, this is no mere gathering of music, mischief, and hidden identity, this is a masquerade.
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