As if in response to the ongoing complaints that Superman, as a character, is irrelevant to modern audiences, The CW's Crisis on Infinite Earths event just upped its game and gave us four different versions.  Supergirl's Earth-38 Superman and Lois encounter several across the multiverse, which provides epilogues for three former franchises.  It seems sort of fitting that Smallville's Clark gets a happy ending, after he got rid of his powers and settled down with Lois and their daughters.  Things did not work out quite so well for the other young Superman from Superboy, who died at the hands of Lex Luthor.

Crisis on Infinite Earths is the gold standard for epic crossover event comics, and its adaptation into an Arrowverse crossover event (featuring episodes of the live-action television series Supergirl, Batwoman, The Flash, Arrow, and Legends of Tomorrow on The CW) is shaping up to be television's equivalent.?

With its third episode (a chapter titled "The Sin"), Disney+'s The Mandalorian continues with its bold and brash style, this time under the helm of director Deborah Chow (who will also be directing the streaming service's upcoming Obi-Wan Kenobi series starring Ewan McGregor). The series' lead character has been compared both to American gunslingers like Clint Eastwood's iconic "man with no name" and the noble and honorable Japanese samurai warriors, most notably Ogami Ittō of Lone Wolf and Cub. Previous episodes of the series have mined many standards and tropes of the Western genre, but "The Sin" gives audiences the chance to learn more about the state of Mandalorian culture after the fall of the Galactic Empire and see the disciplined Bushido-like code of those who walk the way of the Mandalore.

The pilot episode of The Mandalorian landed earlier this week (thanks to the launch of Disney+), much to the joy and excitement of many Star Wars fans. Drawing heavily on the Western genre and “the man with no name” motif, the first live-action Star Wars series is off to an incredibly solid start, and there are surely many out there who are highly anticipating the second episode of the series, available for the first time today. Written, once again, by series creator Jon Favreau (The Lion King, Iron Man) and directed by Rick Famuyima (Confirmation, Dope), the second episode answers some questions while posing others, all while continuing to give us a dusty, mythic story of a stranger wandering the rugged galactic frontier with a mask and a blaster.

Buckle up, baby, because The Mandalorian has arrived, and the premiere of Disney+'s new streaming series is setting an impressively high bar for the competition to follow. Written by series creator Jon Favreau and directed by Dave Filoni (the creative force behind Star Wars: The Clone Wars and Star Wars: Rebels), the first episode of The Mandalorian is stunning, awe-inspiring, and nearly everything a Star Wars fan could wish for when it comes to a live-action series.

I can’t get over how fantastically talented Phoebe Waller-Bridge is. Not only is she the writer, creator, and star of the Emmy-nominated Fleabag, she’s also the showrunner for the spy thriller, Killing Eve – a completely different show in both style and tone, but still excellent and fun to watch. Additionally, she’s the creator/star of a 2016 BBC show called Crashing and was the voice of L3-37 in Solo: A Star Wars Story last year, among many other things. Still, her crowning achievement, in my opinion, is Fleabag. It’s a very simple, very understated show, but it blew me away. Twice.

I remember distinctly watching the series finale for Star Trek: The Next Generation.  The reason why I remember is that I was one of 125 people who won two tickets to watch the series finale as it was broadcast on the IMAX screen at the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh.  The excitement in the theatre before the show began was palpable.  We few, we happy few, we Trekkers who were going to see GIANT PICARD and company sail off into the sunset in “All Good Things…” on the big screen were excited to share in the end of the beloved show.  Two hours later, the feeling in the room was very different.  The episode was, frankly, meh.  Yes, seeing the show on a giant screen was cool (Yay, big Enterprise!), but the size of the screen was not matched by the scope of the episode.  

I am an old man and have been thinking of old men lately.  

Prom Night in Winterfell / It Gets Real: GoT 8.4 in Nine Lines

The night is dark and full of terror.

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