Fiend by Peter Stenson is, in over-simplified TV terms, Breaking Bad meets The Walking Dead. In St. Paul, Minnesota, two meth heads emerge from seclusion after at least a straight week of binging, and find that the Zombie Apocalypse has happened while they were busy getting high. Chase and his best friend Typewriter embark on a journey to score more drugs, save Chase’s ex-girlfriend, and, simply, survive.

Many of the jokes and scenes in Feeding Mr. Baldwin are in pretty bad taste. Those also happen to be the jokes that are the funniest. The entire movie is one big comedy of errors—where the errors involve disposing of dead bodies.

 

Charlie ChristmasArrested Development. It's not just the name of a TV show involving people saying, "I've made a huge mistake," or a '90s hip-hop band that sang about a man named Mr. Wendel who was apparently from Tennessee. It's actually the name of a condition where someone becomes psychologically and/or emotionally stunted. I'm not sure which came first, but I know that the latter applies to the main character in the film The Unusual (Calling of) Charlie Christmas.

 

RushlightsTake one part True Romance, one part No Country for Old Men, and one part U Turn, and you’ll have the basic plot of Rushlights. As crime thrillers go, the plot is fairly standard. But, more important in this type of movie is the execution. And, all-in-all, Rushlights manages to hold its own.

 

LovelaceLovelace is an autobiographical film based on the life of Linda Susan Boreman (January 10, 1949-April 22, 2002), known to the public as Linda Lovelace.  Linda Lovelace is most well-known for starring in one of the most successful porno films ever made: Deep Throat. In 1972, Deep Throat had a huge cultural impact, bringing porno films into the mainstream.

 

Problem of Evil posterProblem of Evil provides an interesting look at religion and faith from a number of different perspectives. The film follows Jason (Ethan Kogan, who also co-wrote and co-directed the film with Jessica Silvetti), a documentary filmmaker who’s struggling to deal with the loss of his wife. While doing a piece on a community garden, the woman who runs it—whom he’s never met—shocks Jason by relating to him some of the intimate, personal details of his life. She tells him that she’s part of a religious group, and that their spiritual leader told her years ago that Jason would be the one to carry the group’s message to the world.

 

She Loves Me NotShe Loves Me Not, which premiered Sunday on the closing night of “Dances With Films,” tells three separate stories of a man in crisis. Or is it one story, in three parts? Either way, it features Cary Elwes as an alcoholic writer, so it’s hard to go wrong.

 

Mutual FriendsMutual Friends, which had its Los Angeles premiere at the Dances With Films festival in Hollywood on Friday night, is an ensemble cast romantic movie, with separate stories all intertwining, similar to, say, Love Actually. However, unlike Love Actually, which was entirely the work of writer/director Richard Curtis, Mutual Friends has a different writer for each story. They all blend seamlessly together, but, at the same time, it provides a variety of different perspectives on different types of relationships in different stages and situations.

 

Forevers EndForever’s End is a small, quiet movie about the end of the world. Sarah (Charity Farrell) is a teenage girl who has spent the last six years completely alone, after everyone around her—and for all she knows, everyone on the planet—was killed by some great, unnamed cataclysm. Then, out of nowhere, her sister Lily (Lili Reinhart) shows up on her doorstep, without a word as to where she’s been all this time, or what’s happened to her. A few days later, a young man calling himself Ryan (Warren Bryson) shows up as well. And, slowly, it becomes apparent that maybe the world isn’t as empty and desolate as they thought.

 

The EastThe East stars indie darling Brit Marling (Arbitrage, Another Earth) as Sarah, an operative for a private intelligence firm. The firm instructs her to infiltrate a group of eco-terrorists who target major corporations. She locates the group members, who live in an abandoned house in the woods, and she attempts to join them. Each cult member has their own reasons for turning into extremists, which includes Izzy (Ellen Page, Inception, Juno) and the group leader Benji (Alexander Skarsgard, True Blood).

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