Comics

Comics (2024)

Space battles! Starships! Danger! Intrigue!

I want to start by saying that this book surprised me. I wasn’t supposed to review it, but I thought that I'd give the series a try, and I’m genuinely glad that I did. I feel like some of the better / best experiences I’ve ever had have been to allow myself to reach outside of the grab bag of things I know I’ll enjoy. The irony is that this falls right in the milieu.

Three Jeff Lemire books come out this week. This is the only one that’s not Black Hammer related, and it’s a creative doozy.

As the Unbelievable Unteens finally all gather, what happened to break them apart is revealed. Like with most of the Black Hammer Universe, we’re given a portrait of heroes whose human nature, even their desire to do good, often gets them into more trouble.

Issue 4 of Black Hammer: Reborn asks a wickedly unexpected question and gives a terribly tragic answer.

Dark Horse Comics’ Last Flight Out #2 continues the tale of family, search, and apocalypse. As the story moves forward, we see relationship history, as well as military battles, as humanity breathes its last breath on Earth. Twists and turns occur, and the survival of the main characters hangs in the balance.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer:  Buffy and Co. took a risky gamble and like all well-laid plans, things go sideways pretty quickly. With no other plan to resort to, the group makes a hasty retreat, but is it already too late for that?

Bookseller-turned-author Maggie Tokuda-Hall (@emteehall), who has already written a widely acclaimed picture book (Also an Octopus) and a Young Adult novel (The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea), is about to enter the graphic novel arena with her buzzed-about new work, Squad, from Greenwillow Books.  In the following interview, Fanbase Press Contributor Kevin Sharp talks with Tokuda-Hall about the story’s origins, writing for different audiences, and her first foray into a new format.

In this middle-grade graphic novel biography of famed scientist Marie Curie, her family background and scientific details take center stage. This authorized account of her life by two esteemed Danish scientists, Frances Andreasen Østerfelt and Anja Cetti Andersen, walks us through the tumultuous times of living under Czarist rule in 1870s Poland, Marie’s first love, the grit and determination to do well at the Sorbonne, her marriage, and her scientific achievements.  It’s also a primer on how a gifted family survived under oppressive conditions. It is a wonder any of them were able to escape and succeed in their professions, especially the women.  

It's finally here. With the roll of a natural 20, the series finale has arrived. It's only fitting that a series called Die, based on role-playing games, ends at the twentieth issue. So much has happened in the course of the series, and while this review will talk about the final issue, it will also tackle the series as a whole.

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