Sometimes, there's a darkness inside of us that pulls us to do or think things we know to be wrong. For most, it’s a tickle. For some, it’s like trying to play tug-of-war with a rhinoceros. Nailbiter has always been about taming that darkness inside and dealing with the repercussions from those who have lost the battle. It’s what makes the title character as interesting as he is.

Drawn like a Don Bluth cartoon, Stray Dogs has an insidious central plot that I wish I hadn’t known about going in, but I also may not have said yes to reviewing it if I hadn't. If you wish not to know what the angle is, stop reading.

Something Is Killing the Children - this masterful, beautiful, gut-wrenching horror story about the loss of children in a small town in Wisconsin and the birth of a kickass, monster-killing hero with Erica Slaughter - comes to a bittersweet end, with the promise of a new beginning.

Ever want to hang out in a dirigible floating over New York City, sipping a Whiskey Sour on the rocks? Well, here’s your chance.  In this fun alternate history of New York City during the 1920s Prohibition Era, the rum-runners established speakeasies in hot air balloons and dirigibles. But that doesn’t mean it’s legal, as Feds and the New York police try to take down the gangsters in the sky.

The low-down: Post York is a grim look at a dystopian (but very real) world in which the ice caps and glaciers have melted, resulting in a flooded world. Set in post-flood New York, it follows Crosby, a loner whose consistent companion is his cat, Kitsky. The graphic novel is split into three alternate possible versions of the future, with Crosby and his brief interaction with a young woman centering each story.

A fairy princess, a fallen angel, and a werewolf walk into a church. No, that’s not a joke; it’s a scene from this new one-shot from Image Comics, Aria: Heavenly Creatures. Every once in a while, it’s nice to have a fun one-shot to read, with no back and forth needed to decide if you are committing to an entire series, and you still get a full story. (One-shots are great for commitment phobes and those of us who have non-committal spells.) This story is brought to readers by the same creative team behind Image Comics' The Marked, and it's a captivating tale of faerie creatures and supernatural alike living among humans in Victorian London.

Quick recap: While Mary/Elaine/Nimue had a chat with Rose, Duncan and Bridgette figured out how Mary conceived Galahad and come face to face with none other than the famous Lancelot himself.

I was a little concerned after the first issue of The Last Ronin. It had been built up to such a degree as something more mature. I was hoping that it simply wasn’t because of the violence, but instead as a result of a more adult storyline. It turned out that the issue was a very well-plotted and elongated action scene. Beautifully rendered from one sequence to the next, I enjoyed the issue, but I struggled to connect on that deeper level. It never really slowed down for story until the final few pages, where a promise was made to me by the creators: that what I was hoping for was coming. That promise paid off in the immensely enjoyable, surprisingly emotional, best Teenage Mutant Ninja story that I’ve read in a long while with the second issue. Because of the depth of the second issue, in hindsight, the first issue now stands next to it on equal footing.

The Young Hellboy adventure is exactly that: a four-part comic book series geared towards young adult readers. A youthful, but no less impactful, Hellboy crash-lands on a mysterious island with his caretaker, Professor Bruttenholm. At this age, Hellboy is excitable and looking for adventure, and he - as well as the reader - will get plenty of that with giant crabs, gorilla-like creators, and the appearance of an unexpected ally!

In 2018, I had the pleasure to review the preview issue of The Bovine League, an all-ages comic book series about a team of genetically altered superheroes - who just so happen to be cows - as they protect Earth and the galaxies beyond from threats large and small.  Created by Andre Owens through his publishing company, Hiro Unlimited, the Bovine League endeavor not only to defend their charges from evil monsters, but to bring together humans and genetically altered beings into a joined community of peace and understanding.  This year, Owens and artist/colorist/letterer Christian Alaminos returned for The Bovine League #1, finding success through Kickstarter for the launch of this futuristic six-issue mini-series.

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