Andrew Chambliss is really earning his stripes in the comic book Whedonverse. The former Dollhouse writer is currently scribing both Dollhouse: Epitaphs and Buffy: Season 9 and succeeding in bold fashion! With Dollhouse: Epitaphs #3, Chambliss turns in another solid chapter to the post-apocalyptic Dollhouse mythos and takes us even deeper into the twisted and tormented psyche of the original damaged doll, Alpha.

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The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

When the DC reboot was first announced, we knew there would be at least some epic fails of gigantic proportion. Hell, it was expected. Well, I’ve just witnessed a major crash and burn with Scott Lobdell’s The Red Hood and the Outlaws #1. I don’t mean to be particularly harsh to either Lobdell or artist Kenneth Rocafort, but, in all honesty, this is the kind of piece that makes new readers never pick up a comic book again.

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The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Wonder Woman.  Yes, I have a hopeless, helpless crush on this fictional character.  I also, after reading 100 Bullets, have a man crush on Brian Azzarello.  So, put those two together and I’m completely at maximum crushable capacity.  What could go wrong?!  (He says as he picks up Wonder Woman Issue #1 by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang...)  

I have two words to say about Batman #1.  But, before I tell you what those two words are, I’m going to throw a lot more words your way to explain why those two words apply (or, you could just skip to the last sentence of this review... slacker).  

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

If someone ever told me that I’d be reading a comic written by a cast member of MTV’s The Real World, I think I might have slapped them. If someone ever told me that I’d be reading a comic written by a cast member of MTV’s The Real World, and that I would f---ing love it, I probably would’ve slapped myself. Well, comic book-sniffers, my cheek is red, my hand hurts, and so does my face, but, damn, did I love Judd Winick’s Catwoman book. Let me fill you in on why this DCnU issue #1 is the cat’s meow!

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Well, I finally got my hands on the 3rd issue of Richelle Mead and Grant Alter’s Storm Born series, and I just devoured it.  In this installment we follow freelance shaman Eugenie Markham, known also as Odile, into the dangerous Otherworld, as she attempts to find and rescue kidnapped Jasmine Delaney from the fairy-like beings called the Gentry.  To do this, Eugenie has to cross into the Otherworld with her own physical body, rather than doing it psychically.  This presents an extra danger for Markham, so she enlists the help of her fiends/enslaved and cursed souls who are forced to do what she says.  Volusian, a demon-looking soul who is “about as damned as a soul could be,” has a love-hate relationship with Eugenie, except without the love part.  He is enslaved to her and bound to protect her, but he makes no secret of his disdain.  We meet another soul, less a slave and more an indentured servant, named Nandi.  Nandi is a tormented soul cursed to roam the earth in endless suffering, but has agreed to serve Markham for three years in return for peace.  Finn is the final member of the entourage who is a fun, pixie-looking being with a big mouth, who mainly just hangs around because he thinks it’s fun.  And, together they head off into the Otherworld to find this missing girl.  

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Red Lanterns #1 by Peter Milligan and pencilled by Ed Benes is another worthy edition to the DCnU and a great example of how to convey links to old continuity in a #1 issue which has the goal of snaring new readers. Red Lanterns #1 is also one of those rare comics that can appeal to more mature readers desiring quality storytelling while also maintaing enough action and violence to keep teenage attention spans in their appropriate moral decline! Nothing like a lead character with a mouthful of daggers to keep the kiddies in their seats!

SPOILERS BELOW

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

For my second venture into the DCnU, I read Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. #1, written by Jeff Lemire and with art by Alberto Ponticelli.  Overall, I am happy to report that Frankenstein #1 was not an overwhelming disappointment like my experience with Swamp Thing #1; however, I feel that I may have been about 20 years too old to have fully enjoyed the issue.

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The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

I first heard about this comic about a year ago at Comic-Con when I picked up a DC sampler.  Demon Knights takes place in the dark ages, 400 years after the fall of Camelot. It is the story of a demon, Etrigan, captured by Merlin and imprisoned in a mortal body belonging to Jason of Norwich.  The two have a Jekyll-and-Hyde relationship, except, as far as I can tell, Jason controls the switches and usually calls for Etrigan before battles and things.  When he does call on the demon, his whole form changes to that of a giant, monstrous, yellow-skinned, red-eyed beast.  Despite his appearance, Etrigan is less a villain and more a roguish, anti-hero who cannot deny his nature.  It’s understandable; he is a demon.

Buffy is back in more ways than one! Yesterday marked the debut of the first issue of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 9 #1 (written by Andrew Chambliss, pencilled by Georges Jeanty, and inked by Dexter Vines) and a return to the relatable, character-driven Buffy fans expect. After the epic tone of Season 8, Joss and company promised to return to Buffy’s roots, focusing less on huge demonic battles and more on the personal relationships of the beloved characters. While not as strong as this month’s Angel & Faith #1, Buffy: Season 9 #1 still delivers on its promise to reintroduce us to our familiar Scoobies who’ve been gone too long!

 

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