If you can imagine a Kaiju story as told by David Cronenberg, you’ll get Ultramega. The very first issue taught me to expect the unexpected, and, even with that, the unexpected doesn’t seem to cover everything. While creator James Harrem certainly cares about the characters he’s writing, or at least cares about their depth and complexity, he isn’t reverent to his creations. This is a harsh, weird world with not a single character archetype to safely guide us through it. Every moment of heroic certainty is followed by one of, well, now what?!

This is the same world that Joe Golem, another Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden character, inhabits. It’s a world of witches and alternate time lines. In the case of Cojacaru the Skinner, we have witches allying with the Nazis. The first issue started us in the middle of the action, with a group of allied soldiers trying to get important information to a church without dying.

Ubisoft’s The Far Cry video game series has long been a staple in first-person shooters. Addictive open worlds, highly re-playable missions, and memorable villains are only some of the things that make the games great. But it’s the villains that fans usually demand to see more of. With the latest delay of Far Cry 6 and the possibility of not seeing it until September 2021, gamers are eager to get their hands on anything to pass the time.

The world-famous Magic Manor is filled with glitz, glam, magic, and mayhem – and this one-shot comic brings it all together against the backdrop of Los Angeles with a unique flair of the 1930s.

Stepping into darkness takes courage. Stepping back in?  That way madness lies.

“I’m sorry, Dez… But you can’t build a home upon a lie…
One way or another… This is the end of the line.”

Folklore, mythology, urban legends. These tales, whether whispered over a campfire or imparted to children cowering under their bedclothes, keep imaginations rolling through the generations. Despite the richness of the stories, people tend to focus only on ones in their regions or cultures, leaving behind a plethora of chilling legends that live only in certain areas of the world.

Quick recap so far: New day, new troubles. As always, human trafficking never goes well, and Zoë and her crew have picked up a mysterious young woman that Blue Sun wants back desperately, for some reason. Seeking a doctor that might be sympathetic to their cause, they make landfall on the homestead of Simon Tam and Kaylee Frye.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, in a high school battle for the ages, Faith put an end to Vamp Xander. A grief-stricken Willow used her powers to open a portal into another universe, hoping to find Xander elsewhere, causing everyone but Faith and Robin to follow her into a strange, new(?) world…

Black Hammer is about stories: the stories we’re steeped in; the stories we’re trapped in; the stories that define us or that lie just out of reach of who we are; the stories that set us free; the stories that we tell ourselves; the stories that others tell us to make things easier; and the stories that we fight to live. While Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston dedicated a story arc in the main series of Black Hammer specifically to this meta-level storytelling, Visions takes our heroes of Spiral City and looses other creators upon them. In this case, Mariko Tamaki and Diego Olortegui approach this idea of shifting stories with some creative mischievousness. They take the family dynamic we’ve grown used to and drop them into different genres and archetypes all together. Seemingly, our center point to all of this is an unphased Captain Weird who is able to travel between alternate realities/stories.

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