Tomorrow deals with a premise I’ve seen tackled a few times recently, where a super virus within a computer begins to affect those in the real world with a weird strain of illness. It’s a potent allegory to take on: how technology and the endless landscapes of social media affect who we are as people. Peter Milligan’s take on the premise differs in two very different ways.

The third and final issue of Moon Maid: Catacombs of the Moon sees Nah-Ee-Lah finally reaching the surface of Vah-nah (the interior of Earth’s Moon) and encountering a friendly tribe of primate-like beings called the Aa-Gas. The Aa-Gas listen to Nah-Ee-Lah’s plight against the nefarious Kalkars, savage human barbarians. The Kalkars continue to torture Nah-Ee-Lah’s protector, Pal-Dan, in the hopes of learning of her whereabouts in order for them to conquer her hidden kingdom of Laythe. The Aa-Gas agree to help Nah-Ee-Lah, and, together, they assault the Kalkars, hoping to vanquish them once and for all.

Quick recap: The Sundog crew’s plan almost goes off without a hitch… but almost is enough to get you killed, under the wrong circumstances. In the Hail Mary-iest of Hail Marys, Grix jumps out of the airlock, trusting in her connection to Vess to keep her alive.

With Folklords #4, Matt Kindt continues to delve into the post-modern cerebral landscape of why #StoriesMatter. Also, what the heck are stories anyway? What happens if we don't know whether we're in a story? Who controls our stories? Are our stories based on the privilege of the knowledge that has been given to us? How would our stories change if we knew more? And in turn, I ask, how have those stories changed me and affected who I am? Does Kindt ask all of these question in this one single issue? No! But as a reader (and reviewer), I’m having an active conversation with the artist as I read their work, and these are the questions that spring to my mind when I read this issue, inspired by the adventure our hero finds himself in.

With the finish line in sight, Sex Criminals returns with the second part of their last arc. Jon and Suze have gotten back together, started planning to finish what they started with BankCorp, and working out what the future of their relationship holds. While our time-stopping couple don't get the full spotlight in this issue, they are at the center of this series, and they have a pretty big impact on its direction.

Where do I even begin? I had fallen behind on reading the volumes of Berserk, so, in the last week, I read half of 2, all of 3, quickly followed by all of 4. I have been utterly transfixed.

Amy’s life in Kokomo is coming apart. David and Cassie, her first friends when she came to Earth, have broken up. Will she need to choose between them? On top of that, Oliver, the strange, white-haired boy who hides his personality’s flavor, doesn’t seem to want to talk to her. And on top of everything else, Amy is failing history class. Everything is happening at once, and it may be too much for her to handle.

Scott Larson returns to the mystery and magic of the Chicago World’s Fair in his annual tribute to old Chicago, Visitations #5: The Snake Lady of the Fair. This installment begins later in the Windy City’s history, late '60s/early '70s, with a focus on the semi-reclusive, book-loving Vietnam vet Lawrence who gets sucked into Blackwood’s complex legacy when a mysterious book marks him as a chosen one…

After escaping her prison cell at the hands of the Kalkars, Nah-Ee-Lah (the titular Moon Maid) finds herself in the underwater caverns below a ruined city, attacked by flying imps. She escapes the aerial nuisance and swims through the caverns, resurfacing at an underground hidden city. About to be taken captive again, Nah-Ee-Lah earns the trust of the city’s mutants by fending off a giant tentacled leviathan. The mutants take Nah-Ee-Lah to heir Queen, who regales the history of the ruined city above, how it was once prosperous and peaceful, yet the ancestors of the Kalkars started a revolution and slaughtered to city’s denizens.  The nonviolent populace retreated underground and started a new life, and over the generations became mutated. Hearing of their barbaric ways, Nah-Ee-Lah resolves to return to the surface, rescue her still-captive protector Pal-Dan, and fight the Kalkar menace.

Mark Millar has a unique style of worldbuilding that makes his comics fun and exciting to read. His often adult themes are infused with a sense of childlike wonder that make you feel like anything is possible. In the case of Space Bandits, that includes intergalactic heists and inter-species brothels.

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