With three mysterious deaths on their hands, Sarah and Miss La Fleur each have their favorite suspects: Sarah believes Mr. Huang is hiding something, and Miss La Fleur is convinced Dr. Caliban is the most likely suspect. It seems Mr. Huang was extremely interested in bidding on a Chinese scroll with supernatural properties at the auction; however, Miss La Fleur had interrupted Dr. Caliban while he was in the middle of some sort of ritual.

I wanted to write a review of The Secret Land #1. I had a little extra time one day, and I decided to read it. The title didn’t really grab me, but the book itself did. I was engaged in this love story between two people who had played different parts in World War II, but were still active even though the war was over. She was going undercover, and he was going out to sea. They have a special connection, inexplicable really, so some months later when he gets word that she’s died, he knows it can’t be true, even though he’s devastated. And he’s correct: She’s taken to a secret island, where the remaining Nazis (Yes, there are always remaining Nazis.) are trying to gain some kind of weird, H.P. Lovecraftian power.

Cullen Bunn is one of the most well-known horror writers in comic books today, and his stories are dramatic. They tend to be pretty serious and very rarely indulge in humor, which is what makes this issue of Black Hammer: Visions such a delight. Cthu-Lou is one of the more genuinely ridiculous creations from the Black Hammer-verse which also makes him one of the most joyful. He’s a blue-collar plumber with the head of a Cthulu monster. There was also Cthu-Louise who was equally as delightful.

The story of the tiny clockwork knight without a name or a heart has returned, and with it comes new dangers, struggles, and tests for this beloved hero. Canto III #1: Lionhearted by David M. Booher and Drew Zucker continues the story of rebellion and searching for a better future as Canto, having found his people their freedom, begins to prepare for battle against the Shrouded Man.

Godhead looks like a deflated Bob Ross. There. I said it. The oldest planet in the universe, a now-wizened old hunk of rock that leads us one step closer to finding the whereabouts of Zephyr Monsoon. Popstar, part goddess, Zephyr is a magnet that attracts trouble from all over. Luckily, that attraction also pulls in 3 of the universe's best men for the job. Strong, educated, fixed? Probably not, but hey, they're not bad dudes, they're The Worst Dudes. Let's see how they got to Godhead and the bad choices made along the way, shall we? Let's.

The fifth issue of Nocterra by Scott Snyder and Tony S. Daniel sees Val and her crew arriving at a mysterious sanctuary where they can finally rest. And after such a taxing and heartbreaking journey, it’s a rest well earned; however, not everything is ever as it seems in this penultimate chapter of the series’ first arc.

James Tynion IV isn’t holding back. He continues to litter Wynd with more and more characters, and each and every one of those characters has their own individual motivations that then draw in more complicated factors. He isn’t just telling a story; he’s filling a keg with powder. It’s actually an accident that I used that metaphor, as one of the characters in the script specifically talks about lighting a fuse. This explosion is going to be pretty big.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the Scoobies seemed to be divided in their mission and affiliations. While Buffy and Giles find themselves losing relevance, Faith and Wesley seem to be currying favor of the Watchers’ Council and the Mayor of Sunnydale. Kendra seems to be the Slayer-in-the Middle, but sides haven’t been taken yet. Meanwhile, Willow seems to be dealing with some major consequences of her portal-opening stunt.

One of my favorite things about Hellboy is that he has a talent for understatement in almost blue-collar kind of way. He doesn’t curse or swear, he’s just over it. He’s a working stiff who just happens to be a demon.

Readers are in for quite a treat this summer, as Moth Hush - the adorably relatable 13-year-old half-witch from writer/illustrator Emma Steinkellner's critically acclaimed graphic novel, The Okay Witch - is back for another heartwarming adventure in The Okay Witch and the Hungry Shadow.  Targeted towards a middle grade audience, The Hungry Shadow serves as a perfect welcome for both new and returning readers in light of the wonderful "recap" at the beginning of the book by everyone's favorite familiar, Mr. Laszlo.  (To be clear, he's a dead man, but an alive cat.)  In this latest installment, Moth is still coming to terms with the struggles that are all-too-familiar to 13-year-olds . . . in addition to the added challenges of being a witch who is very much still in training.  As if that's not enough, Moth must deal with being the constant target of kids' taunts at school, wanting nothing more than to be liked for who she is, rather than feeling like her true self is never good enough.  For that reason, when a magical opportunity presents itself to Moth to be more confident, more self-assured, and more popular, why would she pass it up?

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