Sam Rhodes

Sam Rhodes

Favorite MovieYojimbo
Favorite Game:  The newest version of Halo
Favorite Beverage:  Ballast Point's Big Eye IPA

Batman #1 Review

I have two words to say about Batman #1.  But, before I tell you what those two words are, I’m going to throw a lot more words your way to explain why those two words apply (or, you could just skip to the last sentence of this review... slacker).  

Storm Born: Issue #3 Review

Well, I finally got my hands on the 3rd issue of Richelle Mead and Grant Alter’s Storm Born series, and I just devoured it.  In this installment we follow freelance shaman Eugenie Markham, known also as Odile, into the dangerous Otherworld, as she attempts to find and rescue kidnapped Jasmine Delaney from the fairy-like beings called the Gentry.  To do this, Eugenie has to cross into the Otherworld with her own physical body, rather than doing it psychically.  This presents an extra danger for Markham, so she enlists the help of her fiends/enslaved and cursed souls who are forced to do what she says.  Volusian, a demon-looking soul who is “about as damned as a soul could be,” has a love-hate relationship with Eugenie, except without the love part.  He is enslaved to her and bound to protect her, but he makes no secret of his disdain.  We meet another soul, less a slave and more an indentured servant, named Nandi.  Nandi is a tormented soul cursed to roam the earth in endless suffering, but has agreed to serve Markham for three years in return for peace.  Finn is the final member of the entourage who is a fun, pixie-looking being with a big mouth, who mainly just hangs around because he thinks it’s fun.  And, together they head off into the Otherworld to find this missing girl.  

Demon Knights #1 Review

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

I first heard about this comic about a year ago at Comic-Con when I picked up a DC sampler.  Demon Knights takes place in the dark ages, 400 years after the fall of Camelot. It is the story of a demon, Etrigan, captured by Merlin and imprisoned in a mortal body belonging to Jason of Norwich.  The two have a Jekyll-and-Hyde relationship, except, as far as I can tell, Jason controls the switches and usually calls for Etrigan before battles and things.  When he does call on the demon, his whole form changes to that of a giant, monstrous, yellow-skinned, red-eyed beast.  Despite his appearance, Etrigan is less a villain and more a roguish, anti-hero who cannot deny his nature.  It’s understandable; he is a demon.

Grifter #1 Review

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Alright, so... another Wednesday, another cache of new DCnU comics.  Among others, look for those reviews later, I purchased Grifter, written by Nathan Edmonson and penciled by the uni-monikered Cafu.  A few spoilers to follow, but don’t worry, I won’t actually ruin anything that isn’t ruined by the cover.

Storm Watch #1 Review

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Let me start out by saying, my only experience with the Storm Watchers (can I call them “Storm Watchers?”) is from reading The Authority.  If you’ve also read The Authority, you will know that these characters and their ship are AWESOME [Editor’s note: an industry term]!  Storm Watch is a super-team of “professional” heroes.  The “Mr. Pinks” in a world of “Mr. Whites,” and, as Jack Hawksmoor puts it, “You won’t catch [them] in a cape.”  The powers among the various team members are as various as they are unconventional. Barefoot in his black skinny tie and suit, Hawksmoor communicates with cities, and, honestly, it just gets harder to explain from there.  Though each teammate has a unique costume like their more well-known counterparts (Superman, Batman, Dr. Strange, etc.), Storm Watch reads more like a Science Fiction comic in the sense that the current sociopolitical world makes up about a third of the fight that these characters struggle against (the other two-thirds being, respectively, big, evil monsters and personal demons).      

Batgirl #1 Review

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Okay, okay, so you want to bring Barbara Gordon back to the action?  Make her Batgirl once again?  But, wait - what about Stephanie Brown, Cassandra Cain, Helena Bertinelli (albeit briefly and before sacked by Batman), or Betty Kane?  (Ah ha! You forgot about Betty Kane, didn’t you? Well, Wikipedia didn’t!)  I mean, isn’t Barbara Gordon Oracle?  Who’s going to be Oracle now?  Okay, DC, I’ll shut up and read the comic.

Pariah #3 Review

The third issue of Pariah, like the two before, focuses on a single “Vitro,” (part of a batch of children treated with in vitro cures for a rare and fatal genetic disease, who have demonstrated rapid, unexpected, and stratospheric levels of intelligence upon reaching puberty.  Duh.) only this one happens to be a sociopath.  He’s like a pubescent Hannibal Lector... but with less restraint.  We first meet Robert Maudsley sitting on a park bench, an innocuous 13-year-old casually manipulating a stranger out of his hoagie.  We then follow Maudsley through the next two years of his life, accented by a series of destructive, often violent, incidents, all of which he has orchestrated in order to achieve some selfish purpose or out of sheer curiosity.  With no moral compass in evidence, the hyper-intelligence of a “vitro,” and a will to see how far he can push people, Robert Maudsley is like some child with a magnifying glass in a world full of ants.

Following Sam's review, check out the six-page preview of Pariah #2, below!

 

So, if you read my review of Pariah #1, you know that the story takes place in 2025 North America and follows a hyper-intelligent, teenage "Vitro," short for in vitro genetic manipulation, named Brent Marks.  Unfortunately, Brent is not just super smart, he also happens to be socially awkward and determined to blend in with the crowd, despite being surrounded by a bunch of high-schoolers who see him as a freakish test-tube baby.  Brent's life gets very complicated, however, when a group of "Vitros" are blamed for a lab explosion and the subsequent release of a virus that kills thousands of people. Pariah #2 leaves Brent and, instead, follows the group of teen "Vitros" working at the lab, who are allegedly responsible for the release of the virus.  The fact that they seem to be the victims of a set-up doesn't stop the law from attempting to bring them down with alarming force.  Notice that word "attempting."  So, like a fiery, adolescent, and overachieving band of “Merry Men” (and Women), they remain in the woods, synthesizing moonshine and determining their next move.

 

The FBC Crew got the scoop on the new Star Wars: The Blueprints from Lucasfilm and Epic Ink!  Providing an extensive look at the designs behind the saga, Star Wars: The Blueprints is an extra-large format, hardbound masterpiece, essential for any Star Wars fan!

 

 

 

 

More a tone poem than a movie, this thoughtful, vibrant film takes the audience on the placid, yet emotionally vibrant, journey of a Hobo with a Shotgun.  Actually, this movie IS a pretty incredible B-Movie along the lines of Robert Rodriguez’ Machete.  Coming from the exploitation camp, it has a similar genesis, starting as a fake trailer and winning first prize in Rodriguez’ South by Southwest Grindhouse trailers contest.  After accompanying select screenings of the Tarantino/Rodriguez Grindhouse double feature, it was then expanded into a feature length movie directed by Jason Eisener, written by John Davies, and starring Rutger Hauer in the title role.  Also, like Machete, this movie will not be for everyone, as it capitalizes on the gratuitous use of violence, vulgarity, and nudity, even reveling in it, as it pays homage to exploitation flicks of the past.  

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