Barbra Dillon, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief

Barbra Dillon, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief

 

I am a woman, I am a geek, and I do not look like Adriana Lima.  I devour trade paperbacks like Ex Machina and Preacher, I quote episodes of Firefly, and I will happily discuss the philosophies of Watchmen for hours on end.  I am a self-proclaimed professional VGW (Video Game Watcher); I can back-seat drive you through any map on Halo from my comfy spot on the couch.  In my mind, I am a typical American fan girl.  Having attended numerous comic and geek culture conventions like the San Diego and Pittsburgh Comic-Cons and Monsterpalooza, I have had the pleasure of meeting and befriending fan girls of all shapes, sizes, and ages.  Yet, when I turn on G4, a television channel devoted to all things video games, technology, and web related (essentially, genres of the geek kind), the only females that I see on the screen could easily be mistaken for Victoria’s Secret models.  (Think that I’m over-exaggerating?  Be sure to catch an episode of Attack of the Show, co-hosted by Playmate-of-the-Year Sara Jean Underwood.)  Fortunately, this program casting was not always the case; however, in recent years, the channel has undergone numerous corporate overhauls and consolidations, steering itself further away from its originally intended fan base.

For many Fanboys (and Fangirls) in the geek ‘verse, it may be difficult to find the “right” holiday gift for your female companion during this festive time of year.  This daunting task can often prove to be more challenging if said significant other does not share your affinity for all things comic-related.  

Well, fear no more!  As the Coolest Geek Girl Ever, I submit to you a number of holiday gift ideas that will not only warm your sweetie’s heart but will also have them venturing deep into geek territory.  (I know; you can thank me later.)

 

Cruel Shoes Review

As a succinct illustration of the sophisticated yet wacky humor of comedian Steve Martin, Cruel Shoes successfully functioned as a social commentary on the rise of stand-up comedy during the1970s.  Consisting of over fifty comedic poems and short stories, Cruel Shoes creatively encompassed Martin’s distinct comedic style, which differed so drastically from the counterculture icons of the1970s.  While this first published compilation received countless accolades by comedic and literary critics alike, his popularity only skyrocketed from his already rock-star status as a stand-up comedian.  Having benefited from the myriad of television and stage venues that appeared during the decade, Martin and countless other comics were catapulted to stardom by performing their stand-up acts on shows like Saturday Night Live and The Tonight Show.  In retrospect, Martin’s Cruel Shoes literally demonstrated his career aspirations, as stand-up comedy had always been a mere stepping stone towards his main goal of writing and acting in film.  Now an accomplished writer, producer, actor, and art collector, Martin has come a long way from his days of stand-up and his publication of Cruel Shoes.

Generation Blog

 

In this age of technological dependence, you’re nobody unless somebody follows your blog.   Over the past twenty years, the popularity of blogging has reached epic proportions, pervading the mainstream mass media, employment searches, pop culture, and even politics.  Job search engines encourage job seekers to beef up their resumes with links to their blog and/or personal website.  Major media outlets encourage their correspondents to blog (yes, it’s a verb!) to maintain a personal connection with their viewers and fans.  Your mother probably has her own blog, detailing her latest attempt at Paula Dean’s Chicken Chili recipe to her Book Club friends.  While the blog has become a tool for both major corporations and Justin Bieber fan clubs to reach as many individuals as possible, the communication method is without order.  No harm will come to you if you do not use proper grammar or spelling.  The MLA and APA police will not show up at your door, if you do not cite your reference material.  Aside from the occasional questions of liability or defamation, bloggers can say whatever they want, whenever they want, to whomever will click on their blog link.

 

In the political suspense novel, All the President’s Men, Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein phenomenally depicted their Pulitzer-prize winning investigation of the Watergate scandal, which had implicated and exposed the corruption of President Richard Nixon and his administration to the American public.

 

Chronicling the leads, successes, and failures of their investigation, Woodward and Bernstein created a sensational and shocking political drama which kept the audience on its toes, despite their previous knowledge of the resulting historical consequences.  Capturing the totality and frightening reality of such widespread corruption throughout the United States government, the novel’s thematic emphasis embodied the quintessential mood felt throughout the American public.  Corresponding with their anti-war sentiment for the Vietnam War, the people of the 1970s were becoming shockingly more aware that the government was not infallible, and that its limitless power threatened the ideals and standards on which the country and Constitution were founded.  Overall, All the President’s Men greatly benefited and impacted American society, as it commemorated the complexities of the Watergate scandal for those who lived through it and those who unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) missed the events.

 

 

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