Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Mid-30s geek type with a houseful of pets, books, DVDs, CDs, and manga

Veda Adeline thinks she understands her world quite well.  As a Basso, her role is keeping her head down to avoid unwanted Dogio attention, carefully following societal rules, and, above all else, never being out before sunrise or after sundown.  Her best friend Nico may be a Dogio, but as they’ve grown up, it’s become clear that they live in different worlds.  A chance mistake throws Veda’s whole world into chaos, and she quickly learns that the night may not be her biggest fear; the harsh rays of the sun can kill as well as nurture.

Issue #12 of the post-apocalyptic bullfighter series, Monster Matador, feels like an epic finale.  Ramon faces off against his most dangerous foe to date while trying to protect his daughter and their companions as a third party advances on the arena.  The lines between friends and enemies blur, as the intrepid matador relies on his faith and ingenuity to guide everyone to peace.

Scott Larson returns to the mystery and magic of the Chicago World’s Fair in his annual tribute to old Chicago, Visitations #5: The Snake Lady of the Fair. This installment begins later in the Windy City’s history, late '60s/early '70s, with a focus on the semi-reclusive, book-loving Vietnam vet Lawrence who gets sucked into Blackwood’s complex legacy when a mysterious book marks him as a chosen one…

Linsey Miller charmed me with her cutthroat, fantastical debut novel, Mask of Shadows, featuring a gender non-binary protagonist fighting for a spot as one of the Queen’s assassins.  When I received the opportunity to review her latest stand-alone tale about two young women who trade lives to attain their true dreams, I jumped on it, hoping for something unique and timely in a fantasy setting.  Ms. Miller did not disappoint.

‘Groupers:’ Movie Review

The main premise of Anderson Cowan’s debut feature film, Groupers, sounds simple: Psychology grad student Meg kidnaps two barhopping young men (Brad and Dylan) to use as subjects for her thesis experiment on whether homosexuality is a choice.  As the plot unfolds, it becomes clear that there is much more at stake than a simple test, and as Meg’s careful plan spirals out of control, the only constant is that homophobia is so totally ridiculous.

What does one do when an entire country comes calling? Penny White faces her strangest challenge yet, when representatives of Les Etats Units (Daer’s equivalent of the United States) arrive on her doorstep with a unique request: They need Penny to negotiate with bees from Earth and convince the buzzing insects to return to their native world. The disillusioned vicar steps up to the challenge even when an opportunistic praying mantis with a penchant for Southern sayings becomes part of her entourage. Can Penny successfully solve political issues between nectar-loving species? Will negotiating with distinctly non-human inhabitants of Daer be the last straw?

Monster Matador #11 departs from the gritty, monster-of-the-week (or issue) format and focuses on the danger of humans in a post-apocalyptic society.  Ramon and Adelita attempt to get home (somewhere in Mexico) with the help of their Han Solo and Chewey-esque pilot and furry copilot only to be shot down by members of the Guapo Cartel. (Is guapo ever used as a name, or is this literally the “handsome cartel?”)  Ramon’s fame as a matador works both as a blessing and a curse with the cartel’s leader, since he isn’t condemned to immediate death or imprisonment. He’ll get a chance to fight something… even if El Chango feels sure that our hero will die after a final fight in the ring.

Geek-Girl: Series 2 #5 starts with the revelation that Ruby has joined forces with local businessman Johnny Carlyle to become the face of The Kaye Foundation, Carlyle’s charitable organization that is sponsoring a new superhero team.  Of course, it will be led by its namesake, the one and only Geek-Girl! Some of the other capes enticed to join up seem to have some rather… odd abilities, though.  What will Ruby and Summer think of the new HQ? Can Johnny Carlyle drop his business to be with his wife in the delivery room? Is a random mash-up of super abilities a great idea?  Only time will tell.

‘Jalisco:’ Graphic Novel Review

Jalisco is an uplifting story of a young girl taking tragedy and rebuilding herself into someone who is not merely a victim.  When a young girl’s mother disappears during a family outing, she discovers that no one, not even the police, care enough or are brave enough to help her.  Fortunately, a group of female vigilantes (or Adelitas) find Jalisco and help her to transform the gift of beautiful, traditional dance into a powerful form of attack and self-defense.

The most important thing to remember with any Watt O’Hugh novel is that time is not linear; in Watt’s case, it’s not even sequential most of the time.  It’s been several years since I read the first two installments in Watt’s adventures as reluctant Western hero, time roamer, and member of the movement against the Sidonians, so re-entry into his quirky, time-defying story was a bit like participating in a polar bear swim: slightly terrifying, a little disconcerting, but ultimately refreshing and memorable.

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