Scott Larson, Fanbase Press Contributor

Scott Larson, Fanbase Press Contributor

Tales of an apocalypse in the making have been popular in comics for a while. Whether it’s a zombie tale like The Walking Dead or a gender extinction like Y: The Last Man, society and humanity are always in deep trouble with little hope of survival. What makes a series like Dark Horse’s Last Flight Out unique is its timing. Coming out after (and clearly influenced by) the deadly Coronavirus pandemic, this series is able to bring in elements of real life that would have seemed to be pure fantasy a mere 2 years ago.

Almost 30 years ago, Todd McFalane helped create Image Comics with Spawn #1. This year, he has launched a new, ongoing Spawn title. This is the first new continuing series since 1992. How is it? That depends on the reader’s relationship to the character and setting, as well as their feelings on the content.

Yin and yang. Strong vs. weak. Guts vs. cowardice. In Dark Horse Comics' new series, Lucky Devil, an immortal being possesses someone who is their complete opposite, and then loses their power to them. The results are unexpected.

How did Luke get all of his Jedi training within the three days that he spent with Yoda during The Empire Strikes Back? Further, how did he know how to use the Force in the Wampa ice cave at the beginning of the movie?  These are some of the great mysteries in the Star Wars universe, and Star Wars Adventures: Weapon of a Jedi #2 has the answers.

Universe building is a tricky business. As any fan of comic book films can see, success is spotty at best. This goes for comics, as well. With the exception of both Marvel and DC in the 1960s, there have been numerous struggles. From start-ups like the Ultraverse and Crossgen, to established properties the New 52, the comics graveyard is full of failed universe endeavors.

It’s always exciting, as a kid, to discover the origins of your favorite characters. What is even better is when you can identify with these characters. Greater still is when the messages with the stories are optimistic ones. Marvel Action: Origins #2 delivers all of this.

What defines a monster vs. a hero? Is it what a person is or what they do? Dark Horse Comics' Jenny Zero #2 looks at this question in a unique way.

One of the most difficult things about growing up is living up to the examples of our heroes. Parents, mentors, and others can unwittingly create barriers for the generations that follow. This was the premise of the Flash comic book in the 1990s in which Wally West tried desperately to live up to Barry Allen’s ideals. This is also the premise of Dark Horse’s new series, Jenny Zero.

Magic: The Gathering has been around as a card game since 1993. Since then, it has been adapted into video games, novels, and comics. The first comic series was developed almost 30 years ago, and the property has changed ownership numerous times. The latest incarnation is published by BOOM! Studios, written by Jed Mackay and illustrated by IG Guara.

Futuristic science fiction tales in comic books are as old as the medium itself, especially those that show a post-apocalyptic world. Less explored in the current age is a population affected by radiation. (These types of stories were far more abundant in the 1960s.) Stories about how different genders are mutated by this radiation are even more unique. This is the premise of Image Comics’ Big Girls.

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