S.T. Lakata, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

S.T. Lakata, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

Writer Zack Kaplan discusses “being hopeful in dark times” in a letter to fans, which can be seen in the trade paperback, Eclipse: Volume One. The theme of hope in this story does not get lost in translation, especially since Kaplan has created a world where life must be preciously captured in the darkness.

For a hundred years, a stone has restored a world from darkness and into the light. A land of misery has been transformed to a place of healing and worship. The struggle to survive against wicked creatures looking to steal your soul evaporated once two heroes placed a broken shard back into the crystal, making it whole again. Life became a “happily ever after” wonder, and never would such heartache return to this world. Or would it?

At the conclusion of Masked #3, when we saw a green, gaseous villain form in front of our eyes, attacking whoever was in his path and then abducting our main character’s sister, Raphaelle, we knew things were about to elevate to a new level in the next chapter. Not only does this creep, “The Rocket,” provide a sinister tone, previously mentioning his desires to be “alone” with her, but he continues this psychotic, unrelenting fixation despite having others attempt to block his tunnel vision.

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Dear Sir Patrick Stewart,

For the majority of my 36 years, somewhere near 30 of them, I have been fond of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Not only has this series been a life-long favorite, and I consider it my go-to for watching reruns of TV shows, I have always been charmed by your role: Jean-Luc Picard, Captain of the Starship USS Enterprise, NCC-1701-D. Your foundation of respectful candor, established inadequacies with children, and dealing with stressful situations with a calm demeanor became a significant force during my younger years. I hoped to be that calm. I hoped to be that leader. I hoped to be you.

When we last saw the Nekton family, explorers extraordinaire, they found themselves off the coast of Greenland in their submarine, The Aronnax. The youngest explorer Antaeus, also called “Ant,” was in a robot-like diving suit to investigate the remains of a massive blue whale, but he soon realized there was something roaming the waters several times larger than what was previously considered “the largest creature on Earth.” This realization came to Ant as the gigantic teeth with fins came back to devour the remaining half of the marine mammal.

Darkness surrounds you. Although a drone watches your every move overhead, it doesn’t give you comfort when your foot gets stuck after digging in a large crater, and there are explosives set to detonate soon. Second by second, your slow movements drag you up to the surface. A bluish-green planet stares out to the void of space, while your commanding officer orders you to run, and then to “get down on your stomach.” Did you make it? Were you far enough away?

In a world nothing more than a barren wasteland, the future is so much more devastating than witnessing a helpless crawl through the desert. Human life has been reduced to a minuscule existence: slavery, those in control of these camps, and others being hunted for unique abilities labeling them as metahumans. Surrounding this decrepit way of life is the origin of “the remains of Earth, A.D. 2295” – “Purists.”

Ron Randall immediately grabs your attention with the cover page, as he introduces the main character among a barrage of weapon fire and amazing contrasts of color. Trekker: Rites of Passage defines what a tough, intelligent, and skilled, fighting female character looks like as Randall showcases Mercy St. Clair, a “trekker” – otherwise known as a bounty hunter. The cover is surrounded with vivid pops of orange, blue-green, and white colors, while Mercy doesn’t flinch as she looks back to fire her weapon in the face of a massive assault.

It’s a web series for the ages. Well, at least the period of the Renaissance. Okay, to be more precise, Knights of New Jersey is a web comedy series following actors through their funny exchanges with each other, cosplayers, and visitors at the Renaissance Faire. Sometimes, these moments end in a bruised ego, in more ways than one, and the overall result presents great onscreen chemistry and an entertaining comedy that seems like a seasoned ongoing series.

The list of well-known backers supporting the Kickstarter campaign for Myopia in August 2015 is astounding to see. The expectation for the final product’s success, for those that pledged to the campaign, exponentially increases with signed rewards from Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, Dean Koontz, and George R. R. Martin, to name a few.

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