Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

In Black Hammer: Reborn #3, Lucy Weber’s personal life continues to crumble while something ominous builds around - or perhaps returns to - Spiral City.

Will she make it? We already know what the answer is. We’ve already seen her present tense. The question is, what will she lose or gain by making it? What part of Erica does she leave behind to become Erica Slaughter?

Part of me wonders how long Mike Mignola will continue with Hellboy. Not that I’ll ever get tired of it, because I won’t, but I wonder why the stories continue to be teased out like this. I can understand a strategic desire to keep the IP in the public eye for film and TV purposes, and it most likely still makes money, but I can’t believe that either of those are the sole reason. I don’t think creators like Golden and Stewart, O’Brien, and Robins - some of the best in the business - would keep coming back if it was just for the money. This is a collection of incredible storytellers that Mignola and Mike Richardson have brought together; part of the Hellboy family.

Before reviewing this comic, I didn't realize that it took place in the world of Black Hammer. I actually thought to myself, ah, a Jeff Lemire book that’s not Black Hammer. The refreshing part of this is that, so far, it doesn’t connect back to our main heroes of Spiral City, but only deals with thematic similarity.

I love Cthulu and the madness-drenched horror that’s spilled down from H.P. Lovecraft.  Add a Nazi twist, along with elements of a romantic adventure, and you've got The Secret Land.

I’ve been following Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden’s expanded Outerverse series with interest and curiosity. Where is all of this going? I wonder. A slew of new characters are being introduced, some known characters are being brought back, and all of the stories tend to follow a certain map: Ur-witches show up and cause mischief and our heroes bat them away. Even more than Hellboy, this feels like an ongoing serial which makes sense since most of it takes place during WWII. Even the title feels like a 1940s/50s serial.

BRZRKR has been really interesting. Created by Keanu Reeves and written by both Reeves and Matt Kindt (who is one of my favorite comic book writers), they are telling the story of someone who cannot die and has for the extent of his life (70,000 years or so) been a weapon used for violence. Now, he wants to die, and modern medicine is trying to help him in exchange for . . . ya know . . . creating a super army based on him. Like modern military medicine does.

The creators of this series realize that they can’t go to the same trough every time. So, when they hit a certain sequence - an absolutely vital sequence not only in the story, but in Erica’s development as a child when inducted into the Order of St George - they had to make it feel different. Um . . . holy crap, did they make the right decision.

There wasn’t so much a story within Beasts of Burden: Occupied Territory, so much as there was a string of confrontations, but because the dog characters were so charming and the monsters so interesting (based on Japanese folklore), I found myself engaged from beginning to end.

I wanted to write a review of The Secret Land #1. I had a little extra time one day, and I decided to read it. The title didn’t really grab me, but the book itself did. I was engaged in this love story between two people who had played different parts in World War II, but were still active even though the war was over. She was going undercover, and he was going out to sea. They have a special connection, inexplicable really, so some months later when he gets word that she’s died, he knows it can’t be true, even though he’s devastated. And he’s correct: She’s taken to a secret island, where the remaining Nazis (Yes, there are always remaining Nazis.) are trying to gain some kind of weird, H.P. Lovecraftian power.

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