Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Nice. This issue of Bang! is a fun, clever, action-packed dissection and alteration of another hero from the pantheon of modern-day, box-office monoliths. The first issue turned the myth of the famed 007 on its head. Now, we enter the realm of one of my favorite actioneers: Die Hard. It took me two panels to figure out that this was going to be Matt Kindt’s take on the wearied, over-worked Detective John McClane who always seems to be caught in the midst of some kind of hostage situation. Kindt injects a fun twist into the McClane mythology that I’ll let you discover on your own, but I have to say: Giving a reason as to why he’s barefoot all the time is priceless.

The penultimate issue of Ronin Island has been released, and what an issue. As the Shogun makes a final attempt at the island, Hana and Kenichi finally speak to the underlying themess of racism and classism that have been a part of each of their journeys. It’s wonderful, and it’s emotional. Pak is a phenomenal writer, and I can’t help but relate to the frustrations felt by Hana. By telling a story so far from where I am and in such a different time period, he’s managed to speak to the most haunting truths of our modern society - right here in the great old US of A.

Blackwood is a wonderfully strange and absolutely charming series. It poses the following question: What if a group of modern-day, Breakfast Club-like, outcast college kids ended up at what is essentially Miskatonic University from the H.P. Lovecraft universe?

The fourth and final chapter in the first story arc of Tales from Harrow County is haunting and beautiful.

What would it be like to step into a hard-boiled Dali painting? That’s the question that King of Nowhere asks. That’s the situation that Denis, our dreamer, finds himself in.

Tomorrow deals with a premise I’ve seen tackled a few times recently, where a super virus within a computer begins to affect those in the real world with a weird strain of illness. It’s a potent allegory to take on: how technology and the endless landscapes of social media affect who we are as people. Peter Milligan’s take on the premise differs in two very different ways.

With Folklords #4, Matt Kindt continues to delve into the post-modern cerebral landscape of why #StoriesMatter. Also, what the heck are stories anyway? What happens if we don't know whether we're in a story? Who controls our stories? Are our stories based on the privilege of the knowledge that has been given to us? How would our stories change if we knew more? And in turn, I ask, how have those stories changed me and affected who I am? Does Kindt ask all of these question in this one single issue? No! But as a reader (and reviewer), I’m having an active conversation with the artist as I read their work, and these are the questions that spring to my mind when I read this issue, inspired by the adventure our hero finds himself in.

Where do I even begin? I had fallen behind on reading the volumes of Berserk, so, in the last week, I read half of 2, all of 3, quickly followed by all of 4. I have been utterly transfixed.

The incredible dynamic of this artistic team is working at full force with their series, Manor Black. I was a really big fan of Bunn and Crook’s Harrow County and of Bunn and Hurtt’s The Damned. The three together make a really fantastic team.

Hoo-wee! I cackled openly and often while reading the first issue of Matt Kindt and Wilfredo Torres’s new series, Bang! Think James Bond with a Philip K. Dick flare, both in quite the literal sense.

Page 2 of 54
Go to top