Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

As I dug into my Kickstarter pile, I thought it was time to dive into Pneumatic Cases, a Victorian Steampunk mystery by John Wilson.  If you’re a fan of The Thin Man movie series (1934) based on the novels by Dashiell Hammett, then you’ll immediately recognize the similarities between the two lead characters in the comic and the movie. They are married. They love each other and work as a team, and the female character is the snarky one. Why do I point this out? Because we don’t see enough of this type of relationship in storytelling, and I think it’s important to see relationships where both parties love and respect one another.  Now, on with the show…

Up until a few months ago, I had no idea what a cozy mystery was. What’s worse is that I have a few friends who write them. (I am a bad friend. *Sigh*)  If you haven’t a clue (Get that? Clue?) of what a cozy mystery is, it is a sub-genre of crime fiction, where the sex and violence are downplayed and the crime occurs in a small community.  (Thank you, Wikipedia.)  Anyway, I decided it was time to read something that was a little lighter than my usual fare of science fiction and fantasy mayhem.

As usual with a good story, not everything is what it seems.

Vampires, vampires, vampires. Everyone loves vampires, and this comic book series is not an exception.   But unlike the sexy heart-throb glittering types, here, we get the dredges of the universe who were created to serve a higher purpose. In short, it means these vampires are expendable.  

‘The Deep:’ (Audio) Book Review

What if the descendants of pregnant African slave women, thrown overboard for being too burdensome to their kidnappers, become merpeople and developed a new culture and community under the sea? That’s the premise behind Rivers Solomon’s novella, The Deep.

Ever hear the story of Pinocchio and the whale? (Or the Biblical story of Jonah and the whale?) This latest issue of Ascender quite literally has us diving into the ocean depths and the backstory of Telsa, the captain who reluctantly offered her boat to save Mira and her father, Andy.

You could almost call this series Something Wicked This Way Comes, as just when you think Mira and her father are about to catch a break, something awful shows up. Or you could simply call it good storytelling.

You had me at cyberpunk jaguars and monkeys.

Frankenstein and his creator, Mary Shelley, are an indelible part of western culture.  So much so that horror stories written by other Victorian women have been overshadowed.  Fortunately for us, Kymera Press has dug into the past and searched out horror stories by Victorian women that had been lost until now.  

When you’re running for your life, sometimes, you can’t be too choosy about who you go to for help.

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