Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Ghosts are a peculiar bunch, and even more so for the living who can see them.

In the last issue, Tim’s journey to find out what the Great Machine was keeping from him brings a surprising revelation—it wanted Tim to defy it and search for the truth himself. What Tim found was a duality that co-exists together: man and machine alongside magic and data. The Great Machine gifts Tim with all the data and all the magic, allowing Tim to change into something else if he desires. But what really changed him was meeting the humans who became his family and, finally, Mila.  

Trapped in a mansion on an island during a storm, Sarah Jewell and her traveling campaign, Miss La Fleur, now have two mysterious deaths on their hands: the husband of their host and one of the guests. What was supposed to be an auction of arcane and supernatural items has become a murder mystery, and everyone is a suspect, including the rare objects up for sale. The death of Mr. Eckart has all of the earmarks of an occult ritual gone wrong.  Both Sarah and Miss La Fleur suspect that the artifacts may be the cause of it all, but they have no proof and no leads. What is even stranger is that everyone has had the same dream of shadows closing in on them.  Does this portend another death?

I’m so glad that this issue has finally come out!

I love history, so when I was approached to read the ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) of an anthology of historical fiction about the interaction of Viking voyagers with Islamic emissaries in the 10th century, I had to say yes. I mean, who doesn’t love Vikings mixing it up with the dynamic and powerful Islamic kingdoms of that time period? I do admit that having a Master’s degree in Arabic and the Cultural History of the Arabs did influence me a bit. But then again, it has Vikings.

A fun and fast-paced comic, The House of the Lost Horizons is a mash-up of Agatha Christie, Miss Fisher, and the board game Clue. It is a classic who-done-it where a murder mystery takes place on an island cut off by a storm set in what appears to be the 1920s.

Do you love cats? Detective stories?  Space operas? Then, Pet Noir has all that and more.  This all-ages comic based on the novel by Pati Nagle follows the adventures of the genetically engineered feline Leon.

In this fantasy/alternate history series, we find ourselves in a Mesoamerica that consists of elves, orcs, sorcery, and the warrior Helm Greycastle.  The Aztecs hold dominion over Central America, and the gods bow to none other than Montezuma III. It is a brutal world, and Greycastle and his team are on a mission to rescue the young dragon prince kidnapped by the Aztecs. But the mission is made even more difficult with the shifting Aztec political alliances, leaving Greycastle and his team not knowing who to trust.

I bet you’ve heard the name of Jack the Ripper, right? But have you ever heard the names of his victims: Polly, Annie, Elisabeth, Catherine, and Mary Jane? I’m sure most would answer no, myself included, until I read The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper. As with many crimes against women, the male perpetrator grabs the headlines while the women are lost to obscurity. Ms. Hallie Rubenhold aims to do something about that in this well-researched book.

In this adult fantasy, millionaire racecar driver Curtiss Hill is not only a fierce competitor, but an excellent driver.  The world looks upon him as a generous philanthropist and all-around good guy, but Curtiss has a dark side where he’s much willing to do anything to win, even cheat. His chief competitor is Rowlf Zeichner, an equally gifted driver, but the two have one major difference: Dino, Curtiss’ mechanic.  Dino is a genius whom Curtiss takes for granted until the war that has been quietly playing in the background becomes personal and Dino disappears. Did I mention that all of these characters are dogs?

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