Michele Brittany, Fanbase Press Contributor

Michele Brittany, Fanbase Press Contributor

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

A warrior’s path is a lonely one…

Andy Kaufman was for real. He was born in 1949 New York City – a member of the baby boomer generation – and raised on a modern invention: the television. Rather than a passive receptacle of the programming he was watching, he ingested images of Mighty Mouse, Elvis Presley, and wrestling, and he was inspired. A natural showman and impersonator, he liked to entertain. The writing was on the wall for Kaufman: an entertainer in the making.

When life and death are done with us…
…only the illusion remains…

Imagine in the near future, a world in which technology has been developed that will end death and suffering through loss. Getting there, though, will cost the lives of 30 million people, raising philosophical questions regarding mortality and heated religious debates accusing corporations of playing god. This is the setting of The Resurrected, the first comic book series from a new independent publishing company, Carnouche Productions.

During the 1920s, art flourished through image experimentation and manipulation on canvases. Futurism, New Expressionism, Constructivism, and many other “ism” lenses were used to conceptualize the modern advancements that were taking place in the cities. Some of the Avant Garde directors of the time aimed their camera eye on their respective cities, documenting the impact of modernity on the city and its citizens. Dziga Vertov and Walter Ruttmann were two such visionaries who captured a day in the life of their respective cities into films known as city symphonies, The Man with a Movie Camera (1929) and Berlin: Symphony of a Great City (1927), respectively. Because these were silent films, the directors used images that were universal while examining the flux between tradition and progress.

Comics were never the same when horror writer Steve Niles (30 Days of Night, Criminal Macabre) and artist Bernie Wrightson (Frankenstein Alive, Alive, Nevermore) collaborated on the three-issue miniseries, Dead, She Said, back in 2008. They went on to collaborate on The Ghoul and Doc Macabre, and all three stories have been bound into The Monstrous Collection of Steve Niles and Bernie Wrightson out from IDW Publishing this week. In addition to the stories, several pages of Wrightson’s drawings from the 1960s-1970s are included in the art gallery section at the conclusion of the book.

Charles Brubaker, the creator of the advice column styled Ask a Cat trade paperback (Check out my review here.), has returned with a new collection published by Smallbug Press. The Fuzzy Princess: Volume 1 collects the first seven issues of eight stories that follows Princess “Kat” Katrina from St. Paws.

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, we often find ourselves becoming more introspective, reflecting on the people and things for which we are thankful.  As we at Fanbase Press celebrate fandoms, this year, the Fanbase Press staff and contributors have chosen to honor their favorite fandoms, characters, or other elements of geekdom for which they are thankful, and how those areas of geekiness have shaped their lives and values.

At Creature Features in Burbank, CA, Fanbase Press' Michele Brittany attends the Art of the Buffyverse: A 20th Anniversary Group Tribute and chats with artists and attendees regarding the Buffy the Vampire Slayer franchise and its enduring fandom. The show runs through Sunday, November 26th, 2017, at Creature Features during regular gallery hours.

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