Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

If you’re reading this review to try to decide whether or not to read Mark Millar’s original Kingsman: The Secret Service comic, chances are it’s because (much like me) you’ve seen and loved the movie. This means your main question will likely be, “How does the comic compare to the movie?” And the answer is… pretty well.

Right from the beginning of this anthology, writer/creator Corey Lewis admits that his brain can be kind of all over the place. Sun Bakery is his attempt to collect the projects that have arisen from those rather scattered thoughts, all in one place. The result is a number of strange and surreal worlds that don’t always make sense, but are nonetheless entertaining.

I hesitate to call this a Steampunk story, as purists will note that its 1920s setting is a little late to qualify; however, it certainly has many of the elements of Steampunk, as well as a similar overall sense of fun and adventure. Whatever you call it, it’s brilliant and entertaining.

As time travel stories go, Legend of Novo is fairly simple and straightforward, at least so far. That may seem like something of a paradox to some of you (No pun intended.), but the basic premise is as simple as a time travel story can be.

A couple of months ago, I reviewed Real Science Adventures #1, which involved a group of female air pirates just after World War II. Unfortunately, I missed the subsequent issues, but I assumed that Volume 1 would collect them all so I could finish the story, which was addictively entertaining.

If you’ve read many of my reviews, you know that I love pretty much anything even remotely related to time travel. In particular, you may have seen my praise for The Rook, both in its modern incarnation and its cheesy 1970s original form. I have said in the past that The Rook is everything a time travel story should be, and a comic you won’t be able to put down. That said, this second collection of The Rook comics from Eerie Magazine in the late '70s is… decent.

When I first volunteered to review this book, all I knew about it was that it was an anthology of Steampunk stories, including one story by an author whose work I enjoy (Madeleine Holly-Rosing, creator of the Boston Metaphysical Society comic). That alone was enough to pique my interest. But as it turns out, Some Time Later is more than that.

Even though it’s called Vixen: The Movie, this isn’t exactly a movie. It’s actually an animated web series, with episodes of around five minutes apiece, assembled here in a single, cohesive structure. You might think that would be cumbersome, but in fact, it’s pretty seamless for the most part. The only clue that this isn’t just a regular animated superhero movie is the fact that there are two or three completely independent story arcs within the space of a little over an hour.

The best way to describe this franchise is “Hogwarts for superheroes.” By taking the DC heroes that we know and love, transmuting them to high school age, and putting them all together at “Super Hero High,” the film definitely gives off a Harry Potter vibe, especially in the beginning. Still, by the end, it manages to find its own footing.

When I first heard that When Wrong Is Right, now playing at the Eclectic Company Theatre in Valley Village, CA, involved a dance marathon, my thoughts immediately went to the movie, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? Indeed, this play and that film have a lot in common. They’re both set during the Great Depression, and both stories have an air of hopelessness and despair. When Wrong Is Right, however, uses those elements to weave a very different kind of story.

Page 8 of 42
Go to top