Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

I was a little wary at first when I saw the runtime of this movie: 168 minutes, or nearly three hours. I fully expected to end up splitting it up into two different viewings. But honestly, it doesn’t feel like a long movie. It rarely drags, and it kept me engaged throughout. And before I knew it, I’d spent three hours in front of the television. How did that happen?

This comic makes it clear very early on that anything goes. Within the first few pages, we get a flying shark who battles a herd of laser dinosaurs. There’s a knight, a barbarian, a werewolf, a time traveler, and much more. It’s a free-for-all of superhero tropes combined with whatever other crazy, random things the writer could dream up. It’s glorious.

This movie is a perfect example of what I love about the DC Animated Universe. That may come as a surprise, considering the films I’ve reviewed lately. I tend to be more critical of the darker, more serious ones (e.g., Injustice or Deathstroke) and instead rave about the broader, more fantastical ones (e.g., Batman: Soul of the Dragon or the recent DC Showcase). But believe it or not, the darker films were the ones that drew me to the DC Animated Universe in the first place. When done well, they’re an opportunity to explore deeper, more complex themes in a more mature way. Beware My Power does it very well.

When I reviewed Clodagh #2 earlier this year, I found it difficult to describe effectively, even though I really enjoyed it. Now in issue #3 (which will soon launch on Kickstarter), I’m finding the same problem. It’s a really compelling comic with engaging characters, but when I try to write out why, it doesn’t seem to do it justice.

The first thing you need to know about this movie is that it’s 2 hours and 16 minutes long. That’s a full hour longer than other movies of this type typically are. In fairness, it’s actually a three-episode mini-series, with three different, but related, Aquaman adventures, all jammed together into a single, feature-length film.

This is a good film and worth watching, but it suffers from one major problem: The title is extremely misleading. If you go in expecting an epic team-up between two awesome and popular DC animated series, leading to mayhem in the multiverse, you will be disappointed.

The title of this latest DC Animated offering is a little misleading. At first glance, I assumed it would be a feature-length film, revolving around Constantine. Instead, it’s a series of shorts, which they call the DC Showcase. Constantine: The House of Mystery is just one of them, followed by three others, all standalones.

This new story arc is being released in honor of the 40th anniversary of The Rocketeer. Wait—40 years? That can’t be right! Didn’t it come out in 1991?

The story explored in this issue of Jim Henson’s The Storyteller is a bit different from the previous one—as well as from the original series. The tale is set in a relatively modern setting, seemingly around the 20th century. Does that make it any less of a folktale, or any less worthy to be included in this collection? Not at all.  It’s just as magical, just as timeless, and just as engaging as The Storyteller’s usual fare. It also may or may not have made me cry.

At Last the Light is a gothic horror comic set in 19th century Edinburgh. If you’re me, that’s pretty much all you’ll need to be sold on this comic. Most of you are not me, however, so I’ll have to elaborate a bit more.

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