Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Like a lot of people, I was first introduced to Umbrella Academy via the Netflix show earlier this year. As such, my interest in the comic consists largely of the question, “How does it compare to the show?” The simple answer is, it’s very different, but it’s very entertaining in its own way.

This movie is completely ridiculous—and I loved every minute of it. I didn’t expect to enjoy it as much as I did. Not that I was expecting to dislike it, but I figured it would be the type of movie I’d watch and then largely forget about. I can’t stop thinking about it, though. It’s tons of fun, and the kind of movie I can see myself watching regularly.

It’s no secret how much I love time travel stories. I’ve reviewed quite a few of them over the years, and most of those reviews begin with gushing about how much I love time travel stories. And if you asked me to rank my favorite time travel comics of all time, the original Chrononauts would be pretty close to the top of the list. So, as you can imagine, I was very excited to find out that 1.) there’s a sequel and 2.) all four issues of that sequel are being released at once. I jumped at the chance to review it, and I’m happy to say that it didn’t disappoint.

I can’t get over how fantastically talented Phoebe Waller-Bridge is. Not only is she the writer, creator, and star of the Emmy-nominated Fleabag, she’s also the showrunner for the spy thriller, Killing Eve – a completely different show in both style and tone, but still excellent and fun to watch. Additionally, she’s the creator/star of a 2016 BBC show called Crashing and was the voice of L3-37 in Solo: A Star Wars Story last year, among many other things. Still, her crowning achievement, in my opinion, is Fleabag. It’s a very simple, very understated show, but it blew me away. Twice.

I’ve been a fan of the DC Universe animated movies since they began in 2007. They’ve created some fantastic films and told some amazing stories. That being the case, Batman: Hush has a lot to live up to. Does it succeed? Well, it doesn’t quite have the depth, or the quality, of some of the best DC Universe films, but it’s certainly fun and enjoyable.

Madeleine Holly-Rosing’s Boston Metaphysical Society series spans several other comics, some short stories, and even a novel. It’s a beautiful and intricate world, with a lot to take in. The Spirit of Rebellion is billed as a standalone story which you can enjoy without necessarily being familiar with the rest of the oeuvre. Technically, this is true. Anything you do need to know about the previous adventures is covered deftly in Holly-Rosing’s introduction.

“The impossible isn’t a limitation—it’s an invitation.” These words, oft-repeated by a number of characters, are the driving force behind Impossible Incorporated. They open the door for everything from time travel to psychic communication to an exploration of the multi-verse—at least in theory. Most of what we get from this comic in actuality is metaphysical philosophy lessons.

The quirky jewel heist/buddy comedy continues, as suave jewel thief Mia Corsair and socially awkward hacker Brenda (a.k.a. “Killa-B”) prepare to steal the famed Net of Indra in broad daylight from a museum exhibit. The two are still working to bypass the exhibit’s security system, but Brenda can’t seem to concentrate, as she’s too busy thinking about her secret crush, a woman named Tallulah Blue who posts in the same online forum as “Killa-B.”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart famously began composing music when he was only five years old. What was life like for him, being a musical genius at such a young age? What was it like for his family, having to put up with a five-year-old musical genius? That’s the premise of Young Mozart, a series of newspaper-style comic strips based on the composer’s early years.

The first thing you need to know about Samantha Spinner and the Spectacular Specs is that it’s, in fact, a sequel to another book. The second thing you need to know is that the plot synopsis on the inside flap of the book is almost entirely describing the first book, Samantha Spinner and the Super-Secret Plans, rather than the book you’re currently holding. In fact, even what the synopsis does say about the second book still happened in the first one to lay the groundwork for the sequel.

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