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The first thing you’ll notice about this issue is that it has Edgar Allen Poe on the cover. If you’ve been reading Future Proof up to this point, this might give you pause for a moment. After all, the previous issue, which ended on a cliffhanger, had our heroes in the Nixon administration, helping to fake the moon landing.

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You know Batman, right? He lives in Gotham City, fights the Joker, broods a lot, fights vampires and aliens, defends the rich from poor criminals, shoots people with a gun, and kills criminals. You know. Batman.

When I reviewed Spire #6, I was a little lost and realized a short time after it was because I hadn’t read Issue #5 yet . . . it makes a difference. Now that I’m officially all caught up, Issue #6 . . . is awesome.

The final issue of the first arc of Venus should be called “The Things We Can’t Leave Behind,” such as the worst humanity has to offer. We can send ourselves into space, looking for hope, but humanity will never be able to leave behind its worst impulses - greed and ambition at any cost – literally sabotaging ourselves at every step of the way.

Up until recently, the Image Comics (and OSSM Comics-produced) series Sons of the Devil was a series that I’d only heard about but hadn’t had a chance to read. For the review of this, the first book in the second arc, I went back and read the entire first trade, as well as Issue #6, all in one sitting. There’s something about this series that made me want to tear through it, get to the next part, and unravel another piece of this mysterious and unique story.

Please note that Collapse: Isolation writer Russ Pirozek is a Regular Contributor to Fanboy Comics.


Post-apocalyptic stories are fascinating studies into group dynamics that develop from individuals thrown together while seeking to survive in a hostile environment. Those with the best chance of long-term survival usually flee underground, barricading themselves against the beings that were mutated by the nuclear fallout. Rising Sun Comics' Collapse: Isolation is one such story of a group of people who are living in a facility where some of the individuals had worked prior to the global war that devastated the world.

As part of ComiXology's Comics Experience, independent comic book creators everywhere are finding a new way to hone their artistic abilities and publish their creator-owned titles through both traditional platforms and digital distribution.  One such title is Karma Police which tells the tale of a Buddhist monk who is tasked with removing those from existence who are causing suffering to others.  Sounds pretty tranquil, right?  If you're imagining a serene story of reincarnation and mindfulness complemented by a certain Radiohead soundtrack of the same titular name . . . you would be totally underestimating the incredible fun and excitement of this fantastic, creator-owned series!  Written by Chris Lewis (Drones), illustrated by Tony Gregori, colored by Jasen Smith, and lettered by Nic J. Shaw, Karma Police mixes the old-school revenge vibe of Master of the Flying Guillotine with the lighthearted, funny, and supernatural nature of The Real Ghostbusters.  

Here at Fanboy Comics, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

My what fools these mortals be.

We all have a little darkness within us.  For some, it’s an overdeveloped sense of Schadenfreude. In others, it’s a willingness to look the other way when bad things go down, and yet others have an insatiable demon living inside them that starves for the flesh of man.  So, okay, this third one is a little more uncommon, but then again Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda aren’t exactly spinning a tale like any other.  They’ve managed to create an incredibly rich and nuanced world, with the main influence seeming to be anime and manga, but with flavors of all shades of storytelling traditions worked into the mix.  Some of the most interesting are present in the formatting, with time being treated fluidly and quick jumps between scenes keeping you off balance and engaged in every moment.

When Funko and Marvel partnered to create the Collector Corps merchandise boxes, I was intrigued and mildly excited.  I bought several at San Diego Comic-Con, because I knew the contents would be cool and that I’d want the cache of being one of those who had something “exclusive.”  But, I wasn’t bowled over. Then, Funko announced the Star Wars Smuggler’s Bounty Box, which excited me more.  My love of all things Star Wars is approaching 40 years, and with the new movie (and full slate of movies to come), my interest for merchandise is at an all-time high.  And again, the idea of having something exclusive was really exciting.

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