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‘Terminator Salvation: The Final Battle #8’ - Advance Comic Book Review

I’m back to review Issue #8 of Dark Horse’s Terminator Salvation: The Final Battle. Previous issues spent time building up the new characters of Dr. Kogan, Simon, the three Terminators basking in the California sun, and serial killer, Thomas Parnell. Now, the story hits full stride as John Connor comes face to face with an unknown future for the first time.

While John Connor ponders a future that might not even exist, Marcus Wright seems to serve as a mere confidant. John’s plan is to go back in time, stop Parnell, and, hopefully, not die. Unfortunately, Parnell has almost completely merged with Skynet, and the artificial intelligence cannot do anything to stop him. Realizing that the threat in his past came from the present, Parnell forces John to send Simon in his place when he starts to shut down the Time Door. The story then shifts to Simon’s mission to kill Parnell in the past. To say anything more would be cheating.

This issue moves so quickly that I couldn’t believe it when I was done. I was saying, “What? Where’s the rest?”  The action sequences between Simon and the Terminators are terrific. The panels are juxtaposed extremely well, and we finally get a sense of John Connor’s leadership abilities which were sorely lacking in the early issues.  All the pieces that were scattered throughout the story are now coming together in what I believe will be (and I hope) a terrific climax in the final issues. My only nitpick is that Marcus doesn’t really seem to be necessary in this issue, but his presence might be a setup for something later on.

Since this entire series is so nicely self-contained, I have a feeling we might be seeing this as an HBO/Starz/Showtime mini-series sometime in the near or distant future.

This issue was written, drawn, colored, and lettered by the usual suspects.

Madeleine Holly-Rosing is the writer/creator of the Steampunk webcomic Boston Metaphysical Society and its companion novellas. Please visit the website to learn more.  

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