‘Doberman #5:’ Comic Book Review

Hehehehehehehehehehehehehe.  Hehe.

Do you remember the '80s?  ‘Cause Scott Marder, Rob Rosell, and Jack Lambert sure as hell do.  Doberman reads like Chuck Norris and John MacClane riding jetpacks away from a large amount of trouble in a small Chinatown.  There’s such an intelligent take on some of the least intellectually stimulating inspired tropes from the greatest decade that I was born in in this book that I can’t even handle how awesome it all is.  I just want to rip open my Hulkamania shirt and eat Slim Jims by the case.

A classic cop-on-the-edge-but-brought-back-because-no-one-else-can-do-what-he-does, Frank “Doberman” Doberano kicks butt and shallowly introspects with the best of them. There’s no break from the awesome, nostalgic take on the supercop movie stuff, there’s a joyful joke in just about every panel, and the final page has a moment so perfect that it’s almost as good as “Pain don’t hurt me” from Roadhouse.  Seriously, I can just picture Swayze and Kurt Russel teaming up just to be this guy.

The artwork in this series is beyond perfect; it’s got the great colors and lines of the '80s down pat and looks like it could turn into a well-lit episode of Miami Vice at any time.  The action sequences are amazing and really help sell the over-the-top of every situation.  I really only wish they had put Judge Reinhold in somewhere poking his head out and asking about a banana in the tailpipe!

If you hold any of the movies I’ve mentioned in your heart as jewels of cinema, you need to check out this book, and if you’re too young to know what the hell I’ve been blathering about, then you need to see what kind of craziness we used to accept as the pinnacle of entertainment in this country.  (Also, if you young whippersnappers have played Borderlands 2 and liked Mr. Torgue or the Volleyball montage references out by Ellie’s garage, THIS is the kind of stuff they were referencing.)


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Last modified on Monday, 31 December 2018 22:05

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