‘Tabatha #4:’ Comic Book Review (The Finale)

Erstwhile reader, you have stayed loyal through the last three reviews, so, of course, you’re anxiously awaiting the 4th and final chapter in my reviews of the Tabatha tale.  Rest easy, friends – this is it.

For those of you just tuning in, Tabatha is a comic created by Neil Gibson (with art by Caspar Wijngaard).  As noted, this team is doing some pretty exciting stuff in the comic world.  Check out their link; it’s pretty awesome stuff.  Rarely do I see talent before others do - in fact, I’m kind of a bandwagon kind of a guy – but these guys are the real deal, and you will hear of them. 

So, Tabatha – yeah, I can’t spoil much, ‘cause then I’d feel bad, so you’re not getting much here.  The 4th installment answers your questions about Gustav, the primary bad guy.  All the backstory about how Tabatha came to be and how they got into this pickle is clarified in detail.  Pretty much, all of the outstanding loose ends get tied up and the problem is solved.  Voila. 

No, the big deal about this comic isn’t the general plot, it’s the nuance and twist.  You see, this comic has been asking who Tabatha is from Issue #1.  By Issue #3, you realize that Tabatha is a high-end blow-up doll. (I guess they make them non-inflatable now?)  It’s initially anti-climactic, which is why my reviews of Issue #2 and Issue #3 are positive, but far less than Issue #1Issue #4 asks some questions which are both interesting and compelling, and the issue does one hell of a job of making the reader A) want more and B) love the story.

The question is this: can a lump of molded plastic be the bad guy, or is it just a prop?  When a homeless man claims he is Abe Lincoln, could he be?  When a crazy cat lady claims to talk to cats, could she?  Those questions are obvious, the answer is no.  Neil, Caspar, and the team ask the question in the final issue of Tabatha in such a way that made me pause, as it will, hopefully, do the same to you.  For a minute as I read the last panel, I asked myself the question, “Can plastic be more?” and my imagination took flight.  Flashback to childhood and a better world where this stuff was possible.

So, did I like it?  Hells yeah.  Should you read all 4 issues?  HELLS yeah.

Merry Festivus/Christmas/Hanukah/Whatever

Go to top