'Mind MGMT #10' (Noir and Then): Advance Comic Book Review

 

Mind MGMT 10I continue to be impressed by Matt Kindt’s Mind MGMT, which is no small feat, since I expect every issue to be a revelation. The latest issue does not disappoint. In it, the plot is put on a bit of a back burner while character exploration takes the center stage (and mixed metaphors take the review). Like every Mind MGMT comic book so far, number ten is as richly layered and compelling as anything I’ve read.


Why would a psychic become a private investigator? Boredom. So, what do you get when solving a case is as trivial as reading minds? Boredom. This is the fascinating hell that Duncan finds himself plodding through. I say fascinating, but only for the reader; obviously, a hellish boredom isn’t fascinating for the guy living through it. The first half of this issue is a tragic and gorgeous character piece, while the second half shows the good guy's hopeless attempts to recruit a man who wants to be left alone and cannot be surprised.

I enjoy it when a comic book takes a chance and plays with a different genre or style. I love it when it works. This one works. The story has elements of film noir, but with enough of a twist to feel new. There is a lot of play with light and shadow, with shadow winning. There is a PI, a jilted wife, and a jealous husband. There is violence and loss. Even the narration fits the style, but then there are the psychic powers.

All told, this is a standout issue in the best ongoing comic series. Everything from the art (phenomenal) to the plot (extraordinary) to the writing (flawless) works perfectly. This is the best example I can think to use in the “Comics are Art” argument. Drive, don’t walk, to your local comic shop to pick this one up, and pre-order next month's while you are at it. This is the best thing happening in comics.


Five Dames with Legs up to Here, Who Just Walked into My Office out of Five

 

 

Last modified on Friday, 21 June 2013 01:34

Ben Rhodes, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

Favorite Book:  Cryptonomicon
Favorite MovieYoung Frankenstein
Favorite Absolutely Everything:  Monty Python

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