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Alabaster: Grimmer Tales is part of a much larger, richer mythology than I realized, and coming into that mythology at the tail end, I was in the dark regarding much of the story’s machinations, but still found myself enthralled by the intimate cast of characters and the heavy, gothic tone of the telling.  Jumping into the deep end of fantasy and horror writer Caitlín R. Kiernan’s damaged and terrifying world, I reeled at the intensity with which it recalled the earlier volumes of her Dark Horse's Alabaster series, Wolves and Pale Horse, how intrinsically they all tied together, and how the trials and troubles of the characters built on top of each other, creating a solid, memorable history and strong emotional context.

At WonderCon 2014, Fanboy Comics' Bryant Dillon chats with actor Sean Maher about his work on Son of Batman, playing Nightwing, and the possibility of returning to Firefly in animated form.

At WonderCon 2014, Fanboy Comics' Bryant Dillon chats with artist Cliff Chiang about his work on Wonder Women, what he would want in a Wonder Woman flick, and more.

*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


It was announced yesterday that Sony’s upcoming release of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is going to contain a Marvel Studios-like post-credits scene.  I know what you’re thinking, so did the first film in this new, rights-retaining, rebooted series.  But, that scene was a tease of sorts for where the first film’s sequel would go, something to do with Norman Osborne on his death bed.  The reason TASM 2’s post-credits scene is getting attention is because it will tease the newX-Men movie, Days of Future Past.  I think it’s a bit weird that we’d get a teaser scene for a film that’s coming out only a mere 3 weeks after Spider-Man, but it is significant because these are two separate films being produced by two separate studios.  Of course, Marvel has been doing this for years with its nine self-produced films at this point. (The most recent gave us a glimpse of Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver in next year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron.)  But, the Marvel movies are just teasing each other; they’ve never tried to plug one of the movies another studio is producing from a rights deal that predates Marvel’s decision to make their own films.  This is a precedent-setting, inter-studio deal, and it gave me a really great idea.

Marvel needs to explore a similar deal with Sony and Fox.

Once again, I was caught off guard by the latest issue in Matt Kindt’s excellent Mind MGMT. This series has played with the form and style that we have come to expect in our comics, and this latest issue does that in a brand new and surprising way. In the last couple of episodes, we have seen the group of (ambiguous) good guys walk into a serious trap. Now, the trap is sprung and the action plays out with deadly consequences. There is an unusual twist in this issue. Not a word is spoken, but every page is dense with thought bubbles.

I have always had a fondness for Iron Fist, as he was one of my brother's favorite superheroes when we were growing up. I was somewhat excited when Marvel Comics announced that an Iron Fist monthly would be part of their new Marvel NOW! revamp or relaunch or whatever you want to call it, but not nearly as excited as I was that one of my favorite artists, Kaare Andrews, would be both writing and handling the art chores on the new series.  I have been a fan of Kaare's work since Ultimate X-Men and enjoyed his runs on Astonishing X-Men, Spider-Man: Reign, and anything else he has put his artistic stamp on, like the iconic covers he did for The Incredible Hulk and Amazing Spider-Man. Clearly, Kaare has a great love of comics; he took a brief hiatus to direct the film Cabin Fever: Patient Zero and returned to comics afterward (Praise Baby Jesus!), and it shows in the amazing storytelling in his first issue of Iron Fist: Living Weapon

Kaare was kind enough to participate in the following interview.

Author Justin Robinson, best known for the novels Everyman, Mr. Blank, City of Devils, and Coldheart, cannot and will not stop writing, and, for this, we at Fanboy Comics at immensely grateful.  Robinson will soon be releasing Get Blank, the fast-paced, hitman-filled sequel to the excitingly hilarious conspiracy-noir novel Mr. Blank.  His publisher, Candlemark & Gleam, has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise the necessary funds to print and release the book, and the FBC staff is thrilled to share this great opportunity to pre-order the book with you.

The following is an interview with Victoria Jaczko, the winner of Paizo's 2014 RPG Superstar contest. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Senior Contributor Kristine Chester chats with Jaczko about how she got her start in the world of gaming, details about her adventure model (The Daughters of Fury), and her feelings on the prevailing attitudes towards gender in gaming.

This interview was conducted on April 15, 2014.

The following is an interview with the writer Aubrey Sitterson, illustrator Chris Moreno, and Roddenberry Entertainment’s Trevor Roth, which is the creative time behind the superhero graphic novel WORTH, which was released today through ComiXology. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Sitterson, Moreno, and Roth regarding the inspiration for the graphic novel, how it stands out from other caped crusader tales, and what is up next for the graphic novel.

This interview was conducted on April 11, 2014.

“You hit me! Picard never hit me.”
“I’m not Picard.”
     -- Q and Commander Sisko


Just in case you have no idea who the Star Trek universe’s Q is, I’ll explain.  First, though, how’d you end up here?  Are you lost?  Wait here and I’ll go and get a police officer to take you home, and, for the last time, stop mixing your medication with scotch.  Anyway, Q is a godlike alien being who walks the line between mischievous and malevolent and takes special delight in bothering Captain Picard.  As played by John de Lancie, Q is one of the more popular and recognizable elements of the twenty-year period of Trek that comprises TNG, DS9, and Voyager.  Me, I’ve never cared for Q.  Nothing against de Lancie or the writing, I just prefer my godlike aliens to be more strange and less preteen-who-really-could-use-his-Ritalin.  It might be because I look at Q as the physical representation of the Trek brass (a.k.a. Rick Berman and Brannon Braga).  Wherever their attention is, like the Eye of Sauron, Q will soon appear, bringing his special brand of malicious whimsy.

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