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The following is an interview with Betsy Gonia, the colorist on the latest arc of Witchblade from Top Cow Productions, Inc. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Gonia about the all-female art team on the comic book series, her own approach to coloring comics, and how she got her start with publisher Top Cow.

This interview was conducted on October 28, 2013.

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:


The goblins and ghouls at FBC would like to wish you and yours a Happy Halloween! Today is a day to showcase our cosplay love, carve pumpkins, eat far too much candy, draw Pagan symbols on the floor and then accidentally spray human blood on them, therby unleashing Gachnar who terrorizes the students of UC Sunnydale . . . I mean . . . you know, the regular Halloween things that you do . . .

While all of the aforementioned activities make today tremendously fun, it is just not Halloween without remembering one thing: "Anything Can Happen on Halloween."

I think any comic involving battling aliens has amazing potential, and, to top it off, Mickey Lam (story/art/lettering) has made his hero a science teacher - even better! It’s an incredible undertaking to not only develop the story, but write the dialogue, design the lettering, and illustrate the entire comic. While Lam’s debut comic book is, in my opinion, still in the developmental phase, I hope we continue to see his work develop, because he has a vivid imagination and is a talented visual artist.

Are you a fan of all-things vampire?  Do you want to learn more about the creatures that stalk the night, as discussed by a plethora of talented creators from shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, andTrue Blood?

Then, you will not want to miss the "Vampires in Pop Culture and Myth" panel at Stan Lee's Comikaze Expo 2013 on Friday, November 1st, at 7 p.m.!  Led by Juliet Landau (Buffy, Angel, Ed Wood), this panel of vampire and horror aficionados, including David Greenwalt (Co-creator of Angel, Grimm), Jim Kouf (Co-creator of Grimm, Consulting Producer on Angel), Mariana Klaveno (True Blood, Devious Maids), David J (Musician of Bauhaus, Love and Rockets), Gavin Hignight (Fearnet.com), and Georges Jeanty (Artist of Buffy: Seasons 8 and 9, Joker's Daughter), will guide you through a host of topics that will range from vampires in pop culture to vampires in myth/legend and the powerful hold they have over our society.

To celebrate the release of All Crimes Comics #2, TR!CKSTER and Art of Fiction are hosting a special event and creator signing on Saturday, November 2nd, from 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. at TR!CKSTER's Gallery in Berkeley, CA, and you're invited!

At this exciting event, creators Bruce Timm, Ragnar, Andy Suriano, Chris Ryder, Erik Warfield, and Paul Grimshaw will be signing Art of Fiction books, including All Crime Comics #1, Dames in the Atomic Age, and Ragnar’s new Art of Fiction Sketchbook. Additionally, a small number of limited edition prints produced exclusively for this event will be available for attendees to purchase.

As Halloween is fast approaching, the Fanboy Comics staff and contributors decided that there was no better way to celebrate this horrifically haunting holiday than by sharing our favorite scary stories! Be they movies, TV shows, video games, novels, or anything other form of entertainment, members of the FBC crew will be sharing their "scariest" stories each day leading up to Halloween. We hope that you will enjoy this sneak peek into the terrors that frighten Fanboy Comics!


You're probably thinking, “Really, Kristine? RPGs can't be scary.” While it's true that an RPG system by itself is not that scary, when coupled with the right GM, it can create the perfect storm. While in my case the scariest and creepiest game I've ever played in was a Mage: The Awakening game (All the GM's doing and mostly not on purpose. The full story is recounted at the end of Worlds That Never Were Episode 2), the RPG system that is the scariest in my opinion is the master, Call of Cthulhu. Here's why:

The middle volume of Dante Aligheri’s trilogy of Inferno, (or Hell), has served as bane to college students and inspiration to countless artists in the 700 years since first written, becoming background and foreground to numerous tales and journeys, on screen and on page, most recently in the form of DaVinci Code author Dan Brown’s Inferno.  Now, writer Ron Bassilian is taking a shot at this epic work in his own Inferno Los Angeles, aided ably by the deft artwork of artist Jim Wheelock. 

As Halloween is fast approaching, the Fanboy Comics staff and contributors decided that there was no better way to celebrate this horrifically haunting holiday than by sharing our favorite scary stories! Be they movies, TV shows, video games, novels, or anything other form of entertainment, members of the FBC crew will be sharing their "scariest" stories each day leading up to Halloween. We hope that you will enjoy this sneak peek into the terrors that frighten Fanboy Comics!


I fell in love with The Phantom of the Opera at the age of twelve, when I first heard the song "Think of Me" from the world-renowned Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. Over the years, my love of the music has led me to see the musical twice, watch at least three movie renditions, and read a variety of Phantom novels, including the original by Gaston Leroux, a continuation, an audio book of the original on cassette tape, and a poorly executed erotic re-imagining of the story. With such a deep immersion in the world of Phantom, I should have been able to see the true intentions and nature of the original story, but I, and many modern fans, were blinded by the romantic angle of the love triangle between Christine, the Phantom/Erik, and Raoul. It took my father’s pithy review of the musical (I believe his words were along the lines of “I don’t know why this show is so popular . . . unless it’s all women who have had a stalker.”) and a careful re-read of the original novel to open my eyes to the pervasive horror of the piece.

I hate romantic comedies.  It’s not that I hate the idea of romance in general or haven’t responded to various love stories in the past.  Last year, I really liked Silver Linings Playbook, which was, for the most part, a rom-com with a generous side dish of mental health issues.  The story is largely driven by Bradley Cooper’s delusions about his relationship with his ex-wife.  As an overall genre, however, I find romantic comedies to generally be insipid, stupid, and, even more damaging, I think they give their audience a false sense of how relationship and real life tend to work.  Call me crazy, but I really believe a significant reason the American divorce rate is so high is largely due to the way romance and relationships are depicted in media.  There is no “happily ever after;” reality tells us there’s “we worked really hard to sustain our relationship,” and these movies leave people disillusioned.  Ben Affleck said it best when he was accepting his Oscar last year.  When thanking his wife Jennifer Garner, Affleck said maintaining their marriage was work, “ . . . but it’s the best kind of work.”  I was a big fan of Mark Webb’s film (500) Days of Summer largely because of the way that film savaged the way our culture gives a completely false sense of romance, that there is this mythical perfect person out there for each and every one of us. 

The good folks at MOnsterworks66 are at it again with another horror-themed project, just in time for Halloween!  Teaming up with Griffin Studios LA and Patrick Griffin, MOnsterworks66 is in post-production for Our Zombie Mother, a family-friendly zom-com “horromedy” series suitable for zombie lovers ages 10 and up.  The creators of the series are excited to announce that its star, Tyler Griffin, recently made his big-screen debut in Insidious 2, and full details on his involvement may be found in MOnsterworks66's press release, below.

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