From the Trailer to the GraveOut of a desire to work with like-minded individuals, a fondness for the campy horror comedies and grindhouse classics from the ‘70s and ‘80s, and an unabashed love of Wyoming comes From the Trailer to the Grave, a film that will birth a new genre, the RedZomRomCom (Redneck Zombie Romantic Comedy).  Actor/Writer/Producer K. Harrison Sweeney is bringing together five lead alumni of 2010's Game of the Year, Red Dead Redemption, as well as FANGORIA magazine's frequently featured "Scream Queen" Lindsay Goranson, Mark Fite of Mr. Show with Bob & David notoriety, Jim Turner from HBO's Arli$$, and Ken Campbell from FOX's ‘90s sitcom cult hit, Herman's Head.  Also on board is comic/graphic novel artist Guy LeMay (Image Comics' Dead@17, Viper Comics' The Rabid), who will be providing storyboard/end credit art, as well as Los Angeles-based band The Peculiar Pretzelmen, who will be using their early 20th century blues/rag-rock sound to score the film.  Currently in preproduction and on schedule to film in August of 2012, it’s sure to be a wild romp of guffaws and guts!  Everything sounds very exciting, and Fanboy Comics Senior Contributor Ben Rhodes got a chance to chat with co-star and publicist Steve J. Palmer about the film, the contest that they have entered to fund this and other awesome projects from Big Horn Samurai Sinema, and what the hell a Redneck Zombie Romantic Comedy is anyway!

Flex Metallo MTBy Michael Fitzgerald Troy

 

Fans of brawny men, brainy yarns, and drug addicts will rejoice as DC/Vertigo FINALLY released a collected version of the Flex Mentallo three-issue miniseries, which was originally released some 15 years ago. Apparently, Flex was tied up in litigation with Charles Atlas' people. Tarzan, Conan, dirty knees, look at these.  It's not as if strong men in animal frocks are the most original thing since canned beer.

X-Men with ReviewUltimate Catch Up is an offshoot of 52 Catch Up and is devoted to looking at issues from the newest volume of comics set in the Marvel Ultimate universe, examining what makes them worth reading (or not) and which places we hope they will go in time.

Concept:

The world has become a dangerous place for mutants.  Groups such as the X-Men have been disbanded and the U.S. Government has begun to actively hunt mutants down and place them in concentration camps, but a single revelation is about to change everything...




MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW

Hunter Black creatorsHunter Black is a dark, fantasy webcomic written by Justin Peniston and illustrated by William Orr.  Prior to their attendance at C2E2 (Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo) this weekend, the creators sat down with Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon to discuss how Hunter Black became a webcomic, their thoughts on the digital comics revolution, and their own favorite comics.  



 

 

 

 

 

 

Cabin in the Woods 2I’ve always been fascinated by horror movies but, for some reason, never really been much of a fan.  I remember being intrigued by Fangoria magazine when I was young, and I love me some monsters.  As a kid I had a ton of books about movie monsters, but, for some reason, that’s never translated into an enjoyment of the genre for me as an adult.


There are a couple of reasons for this, I think:


First of all, horror films tend to wallow in human suffering.  It’s sort of the point.  You can’t really make a horror film without something horrible happening to the characters.  A nubile 16-year-old blonde getting disemboweled with a  machete?  Horrifying!  A nubile 16-year-old blonde getting asked to the prom by the perfect boy?  Not horrifying!  Horror content doesn’t play nice.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

Ultimate spider-manThe Top Four series looks at certain aspects of the comic book world from two perspectives: Rob’s, as a relative newcomer to mainstream comics, and Kristine’s, as an older hand in the world.  Each installment evaluates the top four choices from both Rob and Kristine and why they chose their picks.



By Robert J. Baden and Kristine Chester

 

 

 

 

There are several titles in the comic book world, be they the standard monthly lines, limited edition mini-serials, or annual titles.  Each has their own way of telling a story, of delving into or establishing a character’s personality and background, and each is unique, yet similar.  During our experiences in comics, we’ve read several different titles and have come to discover the top four that we feel would be excellent reads for people.  Of course, these are just our thoughts on the matter.

 

 

Gabriel JarretAt the premiere of Morgan Spurlock's new documentary, Comic-Con Episode IV: A Fan's Hope, produced by Joss Whedon and Stan Lee, Gabriel Jarret fills the Fanboy Comics in on why he loves Real Genius fans, how he would cosplay at SDCC, and the inside scoop on the Real Genius remake.

 

 



 

 

 

 


Stay tuned to the Fanboy Comics website for more interviews from the Comic-Con Episode IV red carpet premiere!

 

 

Kings Quest USEFanboy Comics' newest contributor, Jordan Callarman, advises gamers about the path to glory.

By Jordan Callarman, Guest Contributor to Fanboy Comics

 

 

In light of Double Fine’s epic Kickstarter to fund an old school point-and-click adventure game (which is still happening! Click here to donate!), I’ve been thinking a lot about this style of game lately. I mean, I was raised on classics like the King’s Quest series, so this genre is nothing new to me. But, for younger generations, and even a large percentage of my own, these types of games go unplayed. They’re viewed as antiquated and lumped in with all the other old and obsolete games. This is the future! Why play something like Pong when you can play Mass Effect 3?

Which is not to say that point-and-click adventure games (hereafter known as PACAs, because I am lazy) don’t have their supporters. Telltale Games has been releasing episodic PACAs for a few years now that are set in universes like Back to the Future and Jurassic Park. The genre soldiers on, and it’s a good thing, too, because there are modern gaming lessons to be learned from PACAs, and I’ve got the list to prove it!

 

FarmvilleI’ve never really understood Facebook games. Everyone’s heard of Farmville and its ilk, all the big time casual games on Facebook that are built to appeal mostly to the middle-aged women demographic. These are video games designed for people who don’t like video games, in that they can only be defined as games in the loosest sense of the word. As an example, Farmville and all of its copycats are civilization sims stripped of most of their gameplay elements: you obtain structures and place them wherever is most aesthetically pleasing to you while you’re working towards unlocking the next thing you can get and place in your farm or town or whatever. The game spurs you on by presenting you with “quests” like “Build a henhouse!” or “Harvest 30 carrots!” and that’s essentially it. Don’t get me wrong, I see the initial appeal. I’ve played a few of these games on Facebook, and they’re great time wasters, but, eventually, I get bored and stop, because I realize that what I’ve been doing is uncomfortably close to cleaning and redecorating my room, only far less productive.                                                                                            

But, Marvel Avengers Alliance is different.

 

Batman animatedI recently acquired all four boxed sets of Batman: The Animated Series at a yard sale for $20. (It’s ok to be jealous.) Needless to say, I have since been watching the crap out of those DVDs. I’m sure most of you remember the show, but if you’re like me, you haven’t seen it since you were a kid. Well, I’m here to tell you that the show is just as good as you remember; nay, better. In fact, I come to you today with a bold proclamation: that the animated series version of Batman is the best version of Batman there is, and if you disagree, you are wrong.


I should probably mention up front that I don’t fully understand how arguments work.


Disclaimer: I will be comparing animated Batman to the more current and popular interpretations of Batman, since I shouldn’t have to explain why Adam West’s Batman or the Batman from Batman and Robin aren’t as cool. You should have no problem accepting that.

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