Zorba the Greek, a novel by Nikos Kazantzakis, enlightened the Western world with an exotic interpretation of premodern Greece, illustrating the country’s old-fashioned ideologies and cruel forms of justice through their rough interpretations of the law and moral code.  By focusing on the unforgiving, patriarchal hierarchies of the peasants, Kazantzakis examined the society’s ideologies, strict religious guidelines, and overall way of life.  Through this study, one of the novel’s themes, the application of the spirit of the law versus the letter of the law, clearly presented itself in the novel’s horrifying death scene of the “widow.”  While Kazantzakis’ novel was not written to justify these actions, his description of the people and ideals of Greece successfully managed to educate the reader of their reasoning behind taking matters into their own hands.

 

As portrayed in the novel, premodern Greek society was much like that of ancient Greece, where men ruled over the family with an iron fist, and women served no other purpose than that of domestic creature, catering to the every whim of their husband.  The common view historically was that women were inferior, sexually dangerous, and vulnerable.  When described by Plato, “...the morals of women were ill reputed throughout Greece” (Jaeger 243).  In fact, women without husbands were viewed as worthless and shameful in the eyes of the entire community, including both men and women alike.  As was the case in Zorba the Greek, a widow in the village refused to remarry and was then scorned by the men that wanted her and the women that wanted to be her.  In describing the widow, a villager commented, “She’s as you might say, the mistress of the whole village: you put out the light and you imagine it’s not the wife you take in your arms, but the widow” (Kazantzakis 97).

Recently, the Fanboy Comics staff has been trying to keep their social scene extra geeky by hosting movie nights at Fanboy Comics HQ for staff and friends.  We usually discuss current geek culture, chow down on appropriately geeky snacks provided by FBC Managing Editor Barbra Dillon (she’s like Martha Stewart, if Martha Steward was also a Jedi!!!), and get the chance to casually watch a film as we socialize.  We have found that humorous or goofy movies selections seem to work best, so that our guests can fade in and out of the film while enjoying the others in attendance (hence why our first event was a screening of the hilarious Roger Corman Fantastic Four film!!!).  That was not the case for the last evening.  While I loved Zack Snyder’s Watchmen, I had yet to tackle the three-and-a-half hour long Ultimate Cut.  Given the film’s controversial standing in the geek community, I was unsure of how it would play for our crowd, but I proceeded undaunted.  I am proud to report that everyone, myself included, seemed glued to the screen, no matter what their feelings of the film may have been afterward. Yes, we may have had to pause mid-way through the film for a blue penis cake break, but the geeky die-hards that make up Fanboy Comics and its followers made it to the end!  Nice job, gang!

The first thing I noticed about Watchmen: The Ultimate Cut was how easily I forgot that I had seen this film five or six times in theaters, as I got lost in its world once more.  I know there’s a lot of criticism out there for the film and I have my own issues with certain parts of the film, but damn is it a good film!  The first scene where The Comedian meets his end followed by the amazing opening credits sequence set to Bob Dylan’s "The Times They Are A-Changin’" is honestly worth the price of admission, alone! Anyways, let’s get to the unique pluses of the The Ultimate Cut.  (But, if you have the opportunity, I would implore you to give Zack Snyder’s Watchmen a second viewing... and then, go read the graphic novel again just for good measure. You know you want to.

Hello, my name is Barbra, and I am in love with a geek.  

Star Wars, Firefly, Halo, Buffy, Preacher, Alien, Battlestar Galactica - these are all staples in my life, all of which have seeped into my movie/TV viewing schedule, my everyday conversations, and even my apartment decor.  Being in a relationship with a geek has expanded my artistic tastes and allowed me to be a part of a larger community, but, most importantly, it has provided me with the chance to connect with someone who holds these and other areas of fandom near and dear to his heart.  For the throngs of men and women who may be longing for similar relationship bliss this Valentine’s Day, I submit to you the following suggestions for finding love with a geek (or coming to terms with your geek-tastic significant other).  

SPOILERS

“I hope to show you reflections of your friends, your neighbors, your families, and yourselves, and what their reactions are to the extreme situations on this book.”  
- Robert Kirkman



Over the past seven years, writer Robert Kirkman (Battle Pope, Invincible) has found quite a literary and theatrical phenomenon with his series, The Walking Dead.  The story follows a band of unlikely heroes in their daily trials and tribulations, given their extraordinary circumstances in a world devastated by a zombie apocalypse.  Initiated as a graphic novel series in 2003, the books were met with rave reviews from critics and fans alike, most notably with its receipt of the Eisner Award in 2010 for Best Continuing Series.  In 2010, AMC released The Walking Dead as a television series, which garnered such a positive response that the network ordered an extended, 13-episode second season.

I was very excited to see this film.  Aliens and Predator were my bread and butter as a kid, and Predator, in my opinion, still stands strong to this day, outdoing most current action films. Robert Rodriguez returning the Predator franchise to its former glory was not something I was about to miss! Sadly, while Predators makes a fine chapter in the Predator universe, it squanders the opportunity to upstage the original the way some feel Aliens did to Alien.

 

SPOILERS BELOW

 

The setting for this movie is brilliant, and it’s a shame that it is not used to its full potential. Royce (Adrian Brody), a deadly mercenary, finds himself stranded on an alien planet with other expert killers gathered from all over the earth. Apparently, this tribe of predators has prepared this planet as a game preserve with prey from all over the galaxy, and now it’s trophy hunting time! The scenario is ripe with potential! Instead, the film treads too closely to the original, never seizing the strength of its new and unique plot.

Buffy Season Eight has been a long, ambitious journey, but, as with all seasons, it has come to an end.  As with other well-constructed shows, the previous seasons of Buffy featured overarching themes that were revisited in each season’s finale.   While Buffy has struggled to convince its fan base that this was still possible in Buffy's venture into comics, Season Eight and its messages can now be viewed as a whole.  While not flawless, the season remained a major accomplishment for the Buffy team and gave a Whedonish view of what happens when you change the world and how, despite good intentions, no one can completely hold onto the mantel of hero or villain when operating on a global level.

 

SPOILERS BELOW

 

As is the case with many young children, I was fairly obsessed with dinosaurs at a young age. I was so obsessed, in fact, that Tyrannosaurus Rex quickly became my personal hero and could do no wrong. T-Rex killed a herbivore? A guy’s gotta eat! T-Rex has small arms? That’s the way he wants it! T-Rex is fighting Triceratops? Ain’t no Triceratops walking away from this battle! Understandably, I was extremely upset upon my first viewing of King Kong (1933) when my boy, T-Rex, was brutally killed by the big, dumb ape. That day of my youth forever cemented both my distrust of large apes and my undying loyalty to the Tyrant Lizard. So, of course, it was a given that when my hero returned to the silver screen in 1993 (sans his big, hairy murderer) I was sold before he (She, actually, given that all the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park are female. I DID go around and lift up the dinosaur’s skirts!) crushed his first Ford Explorer. Obviously, I wasn’t the only one enamored with Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park considering the massive box office numbers it pulled in ($914,691,118 worldwide), the two sequels it spawned, and the fact that it bares sole credit for making Velociraptor a household name.

Something Animal

Something Animal

"Something Animal is a story that revisits the terror and hunger of traditional vampire mythology." - Fiction State of Mind

SYNOPSIS:
After witnessing his sister's brutal murder, Jack struggles to cope with the disturbing, psychological aftermath. Tormented by images of the attack, Jack finds himself physically ill and unable to eat.

Scared and alone, he is forced to confront a growing thirst for blood and the harsh reality that either his sanity is quickly crumbling or that he is turning into something else... something dark... something animal...





CREATORS
Written by: Bryant Dillon (Identity Thief) and Sam Rhodes
Based on an Original Short Story by: Ben Rhodes
Illustrated/Photographed by: Robert Burrows

Genre: Horror, Psychological Thriller
Audience: Mature

Price: $14.99

Join Something Animal:    








 

 

Movie sequels are rarely good, especially ones that have a decade or more gap between them.  Luckily, Tron: Legacy was able to break free from this stigma and was one of the few good movies in a mostly lackluster year of film.

When watching the movie, I remembered the wonder and awe that used to come from experiencing a Disney movie and, for a moment, forgot what an evil corporation it was.

The movie is far from perfect, but extremely enjoyable.  The story moved slowly at times, but I found this refreshing, as most movies these days try to shove far too many side plots and superfluous scenes in just to make it more fast-paced.

For most fans of geek culture, San Diego Comic-Con is a yearly event that is not to be missed.  Fans travel far and wide to attend the four-day convention, which has come to encompass all things pop culture: movies, television, video games, sci-fi, toys, manga, horror, and comic books.  Initiated in 1970 to celebrate the comic book industry and film/television, the convention has increasingly become home to Hollywood and the entertainment industry at large within the past decade.  Despite being an initial focus of the convention, the major film and television studios have inserted their dominance over its media attention and convention hall space.   These media giants brought with them a perceived imperialistic presence that created a social hierarchy, which fans of geek culture used to avoid at comic conventions.   Tickets that were available for convention goers have now been set aside en masse for agents, managers, film and TV celebrities, and their entourages.  With this transformation, serious concerns have surfaced with regard to overcrowding, ticket sales, and angst amongst convention patrons, who long for the days of being able to enjoy the convention for its original purpose without having to fight the crowds.  This year, with pre-ordered tickets selling out at astronomical rates and booth availability for independent comic book vendors becoming more sparse, fans have been forced to deal with multiple failed attempts to purchase online tickets due to server overload.

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