As I look back at Season 1 of Star Wars: The Clone Wars and how much I recommended it for parents to watch with or have their kids watch, I feel there needs to be a pause button on younger children continuing on to Season 2. Today on the Geeky Parent Guide, as we celebrate the 10th anniversary of The Clone Wars (October 3), let’s explore why I believe kids like my own, ages 4 and 5, might want to have their parents watch the second season of the hit show before your kids watch it.

It was ten years ago today that the animated cartoon, Star Wars: The Clone Wars, premiered on the Cartoon Network. The series followed on the heels of an animated film by the same name that had been released in August, 2008. Spanning six seasons, the TV series was set during the prequel films, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith and conveyed events that took place in the Star Wars universe during a three-year period of time that was not portrayed in the films. The show has the distinction of becoming the most watched series premiere in the history of Cartoon Network and was nominated (and won) several awards; however, news of cancellation was not well received by fans of the series, and the last episode became available on Netflix on March 7, 2014. Fortunately, at this summer’s San Diego Comic-Con, fans rejoiced when Lucasfilm announced that the series would return with 12 episodes which will be released on Disney’s streaming channel in 2019.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, the animated series created by George Lucas and supervised under the leadership of Dave Filoni (Avatar: The Last Airbender). While there are many amazing accomplishments and meaningful additions to the Star Wars mythology that come from The Clone Wars series, for many fans (myself included), the greatest gift the animated show has offered are the various ways that Lucas and Filoni's series filled out, patched up, and, frankly, improved upon the much-derided Star Wars prequel films. Below are several of the most important and impactful ways the prequels retroactively benefited from the existence of The Clone Wars series.

The following is an interview with Chris Spalton, creator of the comic book series, The Eelman Chronicles. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Spalton about the inspiration behind the series, his creative process in balancing both the writing and illustrative duties, what he hopes that readers will take away from the story, and more!

As a parent, I have felt apprehensive about letting my four and five-year-olds attend a pop culture convention. Will they feel overwhelmed by the large number of people? Will they get scared by amazingly detailed costumes? Or will they see something I’m not sure they’re ready to see with adult-themed displays?

“And what you said about stories.  I really get that now.  You’d said they weren’t about filling time, entertainment.  Not that that’s wrong, a story can be both meaningful and entertaining, you’d said, should be both for it to resonate.  You told me that stories connected us, made us understand ourselves and each tear a little better.  That stories made the world a better place because they are empathy engines.
I like that.  Empathy engine.  Vroom vroom.
It's a noble cause, storytelling, you’d said. Noble work.
So, here I go being noble.”

The following is an interview with Shawn Sheehy, co-creator of the upcoming pop-up book, Beyond the Sixth Extinction, from Candlewick Studio. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Sheehy about the inspiration behind the book, his shared process with the creative team, what readers can anticipate from the release, and more!

For all of its captivating elements, it is the setting of Jook Joint that is its most scrumptious. Taking place in the backwoods swampland of what is likely the Louisiana Bayou, we get to spend time with characters criminally underrepresented in fiction. Jook Joint is referring to a whore-house that doubles as a feeding ground for man-eating monsters. I say “man-eating” both literally and metaphorically. Jook Joint is also a brand new book by Image Comics that is about women taking gory revenge on their systematic abuse and oppression by terrible men. It is horror at its most poignant.

Blackbird uses magic and sadness to tell the desperate story of a tragic earthquake survivor, and her cat.

Dead Rabbit is a love letter to the rough justice pioneered by the likes of Frank Miller in the late '80s and early '90s. It’s dark and wickedly violent. Like most of those heroes of yesteryear, we get to see bad guys putting down bad guys. It feels wrong. It feels cathartic. In a time when the world is just as scary as it’s ever been, one man taking the visceral weight of crime on his own shoulders certainly revs MY engine. Anyone likely unsatisfied with our current socio-economic climate will likely find a bloody home in Dead Rabbit.

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