“Between the Panels” is a bi-weekly interview series focusing on comic book creators of all experience levels, seeking to examine not just what each individual creates, but how they go about creating it.

Quick recap of “New Sheriff in the ‘Verse” so far: The Chang-Benitez gang came up against the Bandit King and refused his protection for a cut of their takings. Mal arrested them in order to protect them from Blue Sun’s massively overpowered enforcers, but the merry trio are busted out of jail… by the Bandit King.  

Quick recap: Prepare yourself for some epic irony. Duncan and Bridgette kill Beowulf. So… who should come knocking at Bridgette’s door but the monster that Beowulf slew in the poem. If you know, you know.   

The following is an interview with David Booher and Drew Zucker on the release of Canto II: The Hollow Men from IDW Publishing. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Booher and Zucker about the follow-up to their critically acclaimed series (Canto), their shared creative process in revisiting the world and characters, and more!

A small-town bank heist turns into a big-time problem. Cole Caudle is aging out of the game and planned on riding off into the sunset with one last score, but he accidentally stole from the wrong people. Reprinted for the first time in over a decade, Last of the Independents is Matt Fraction and Kieron Dwyer's action-packed homage to '70s tough guys.

We are currently living in a time where people who have been constantly othered feel more freedom to express their truths and know that others will be listening.  Sayra Begum’s intensely personal graphic novel, Mongrel, examines the life of a young Muslim woman coming of age in modern Great Britain.  Her path is doubly difficult, because her father is a white British Muslim convert while her mother is a traditional Bangladeshi woman, so she has ties to two worlds but cannot fully claim either as her heritage.

The following is an interview with writer David Pepose regarding the launch of his new Kickstarter campaign for The O.Z. #1. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Pepose about the inspiration behind the story, his shared creative process in working with the creative team, what he hopes that readers will take away from The O.Z., and more!  Plus, check out the preview of issue #1 below!

As the impact of the Coronavirus continues to reverberate throughout the comic book industry and our society as a whole, we at Fanbase Press would like to provide an opportunity for all comics industry professionals to join together in solidarity. On Saturday, August 22, at 10 a.m./PST, Fanbase Press will host its weekly Creator Forum: Group Discussion, an hour-long, informal discussion about the positive ways to cope with the changing comics landscape. Taking place via the Zoom platform (video and audio), the Creator Forum will be free to join and limited to the first 100 attendees to RSVP. The previous Group Discussions have been a great success, with creators, publishers, media professionals, and educators from across the comics medium discussing new and positive ideas. We hope that this discussion will provide an opportunity to re-connect with colleagues, to find new resources and information, and to build hope in collaborating with other comics creators.

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

Blood in the Mirror is an anthology of seven horror stories that center loosely around the theme of mirrors. Each writer’s tale is unique, and the stories range from imaginative retellings of folk tales to exorcisms, exploring pasts and futures through a genre lens that is less restricted than one would think, often contextualizing the term “horror” in their own right.

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