Given that this year sees the 40th anniversary of director Ridley Scott’s original Alien (1979) film, the Fanbase Press crew (and some of the creators from our published projects) wanted to take the time to reflect on the fateful final journey of the commercial towing vessel, Nostromo, and why Scott’s cinematic masterpiece continues to endure four decades after its release.

Alien Day this year celebrates the 40th anniversary of the classic horror, sci-fi film, Alien. The film is recognized for creating a legendary hero and villain (Ripley and Xenomorphs) and feature films and comic books are still being made to expand upon the original story.  If you’re familiar with Alien or any of its following stories, it’s obvious that this franchise isn’t necessarily kid-friendly.

While the entire last decade can be described as a transformative (and, in many ways, the golden) age of "geek" media, 2019 holds a special place as the year that will see three of the greatest cinematic pop culture narratives ever to receive their final chapter. No fan can be blamed from harboring huge expectations going into the final episode of Game of Thrones or the end of Star Wars' Skywalker saga; however, the bar has now been set even more incredibly high for the finale of those hugely popular franchises due to the near-perfect final piece in the Marvel Cinematic Universe's 22-movie storyline that is Avengers: Endgame.

When I was seventeen years old, I got hired at what’s still the best job I’ve ever had. The official policy of Comics & Comix was that employees had to be eighteen, due to the “adult” comic section in one corner of the store. Apparently, the manager saw some combination of enthusiasm and/or maturity on my part that overrode any misgivings she had. I showed up to work each day at a wonderland of comic books, magazines, toys, and t-shirts. The walls were lined with posters and back issues from bygone years, and the stereo (in those pre-Spotify days) was tuned always to classic rock.

When it comes to the sword and planet genre, Edgar Rice Burroughs was certainly the genre progenitor with his Barsoom series of books starring John Carter. Maybe not as renowned as the Barsoom books, but just as beloved, is Burroughs’ other sword and planet line, the Venus series with Carson Napier. This series of books imagines Venus (long before the Soviet Venera probes exposed the planet as a hot, harsh, and unforgiving place) as a oceanic planet, much like Earth. While the Venus series of books concluded decades ago, Napier’s adventures continue in other media, with American Mythology’s comic series, Carson of Venus: The Flames Beyond being the newest story arc.

I wish I had a more inspired rationale for why I choose the comics I'm going to read. Many are either properties I already like or recommendations from other fans. When it comes to finding new works, I tend to choose based on the cover and title. The one good thing about this is that I often go into stories with little to no expectations which is exactly how I approached Ghost Tree #1.

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level.  Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or less-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

The latest episode of American Gods, “Treasure of the Sun,” tells the history of Mad Sweeney through a series of flashbacks, and it only seems fitting to depict story of such an unconventional leprechaun backwards.  Starting with a prophecy of his death, his journey traces back to the beginning of his descent.

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