Zombies, pirates, vampires, goddesses, romance, and battles: There is something for everyone in this latest edition of Angel, Time and Tide. The cover vignettes are spectacular, both enticing and jarring. Whisked away in a sweeping, romantic dip are a couple in period attire on the cover, inviting you into a magical, and yet dangerous, world. I was immediately struck by the boat etched in the woman's dress - its passengers and their stories. Turn the page to behold Angelus, the man in period dress now ripping into a woman’s neck and dripping in blood.

The Dragon Age franchise has a lot of incredible entries, with several hit games in its past. Through Dark Horse Comics, that lineage has continued with several popular and well-done comic books in this universe, and Dragon Age: Knight Errant is no exception to the rule. The story focuses on an elven squire who leads a double life as follower of her knight, and as a thief who uses her position as a cover for her secret occupation. This gets complicated as the elven squire, Vaea, is asked to handle a task for the Inquisition, an organization that is well known to those who have spent time inside the world of this franchise. This narrow path leads Vaea into uncharted territory and potentially puts her at odds with both the knight who saved her from her past life and with those who would look to take the objects she targets for themselves.

"Tristan pulled Cade up, ending their break.  'Let’s go, little brother,' he said.  'We’re almost there.'  Cade looked at his brother and felt the need to say something.  Something important.  Soon, things would never be the same for them again.  Tristan was about to be vaulted into a new life, and Cade would continue to be just Cade.  It was as if Cade were standing on a hand platform, watching his brother board a ship that would take him somewhere he could never go.  The idea filled Cade with a sense of loss, to mourning.  But before Tristan departed, Cade wanted to somehow capture this moment and hold it so he could think back, fondly, on the last time there were a pair.  Just like they had always been.”     -Chapter 2

During the 1920s, art flourished through image experimentation and manipulation on canvases. Futurism, New Expressionism, Constructivism, and many other “ism” lenses were used to conceptualize the modern advancements that were taking place in the cities. Some of the Avant Garde directors of the time aimed their camera eye on their respective cities, documenting the impact of modernity on the city and its citizens. Dziga Vertov and Walter Ruttmann were two such visionaries who captured a day in the life of their respective cities into films known as city symphonies, The Man with a Movie Camera (1929) and Berlin: Symphony of a Great City (1927), respectively. Because these were silent films, the directors used images that were universal while examining the flux between tradition and progress.

The following is an interview with director Farbod Ardebili regarding his recently released Batman fan film, Bats & Jokes. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Ardebili about his inspiration for the film, how he sets Bats & Jokes apart from the Batman mythos, the creative process of working with the cast and crew, and more!

With the full force of both Marvel and DC movie campaigns raging with their spectacular, firework-laced steam, comic book women have been more prominent on cinema screens in 2017 than ever before, showing that they are "wanted, needed, and can be successful."

If the Hollywood sci-fi movies of 2017 have one unifying special effect that will come to epitomize the collective output of the year, it won’t be disk-shaped space ships, plastic actors reincarnated from the uncanny valley, or unending dustscapes of an orange-tinted future; it would be the damp-squib of disappointment.

Regeneration episodes on Doctor Who have a tendency to be a bit too self-indulgent—especially when they are paired with a head writer’s final episode. (Yes, I am talking about “The End of Time.”)  The reason is obvious: The story is supposed to reflect back on the current era of the show while tying up loose ends and looking forward to the next era.

The following is an interview with author Justin Robinson regarding this year's installment of the writing competition, Reanimated Rumble.  In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Robinson about the rules of the competition, his participation in this year's installment, how readers and writers can get involved, and more!

The second installment of Poe Noir is a compelling, mind-blowing adventure. Tim Zajac and Miguel Acedo have penned superb adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe’s classic tales while Graham Sisk’s stunning black-and-white art continues to leave me awestruck. Both episodes in this issue deal with obtrusive power and the subsequent breakdown that follows, retaining Poe’s dark themes but depicting them through classic noir rhythms.

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