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The following is an interview with writer Gavin Hignight (Nickelodeon's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, The Freak Table) and artist James Emmett (Ex Occultus: Seal of Solomon), the creative team behind the sci-fi web comic The Concrete World, which is nearing its 200th released page. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Hignight and Emmett about the initial inspiration for the web comic, the process of compiling the creative team, the upcoming plans for the story's final act, and the other projects on which they are currently working!

The creators behind Penguins vs. Possums: Volume One discuss the differences between the two species, as well as the main characters of the comic.

Hello, listeners!

Regular readers of Fanboy Comics know that I'm a huge fan of the occult mystery noir comic series Sparrow and Crowe: The Demoniac of Los Angeles from Hermes Press. The series recently wrapped up its five-issue run and is now set to come out in trade for August. I had the pleasure of speaking with David Accampo, one of the writers of the series, about the comic, the inspirations behind it, the cool additions we can expect in the trade, and the importance of pre-ordering for an indie project like this.

“For all we know, you really were sent by the Prophets.”
“I was sent by Commander Sisko!”
     - Dr. Bashir and Chief O’Brien


Roddenberry’s vision was of a future where all men are brothers. (Sorry, gay guys.)  There would be no interpersonal conflict in the utopian Federation, which makes writing for Star Trek a unique challenge.  Fortunately, the show happened to be about a bunch of maniacs piled into a starship zooming around space, looking for trouble.  Yes, I realize I just made Captain Kirk sound like some kind of space greaser, but, in my defense, that’s exactly what he was.  Kirk existed to punch half the things and have sex with the other half.  If he had just been a fist attached to a penis, his job performance would not have suffered in the least.

The following is an interview with Shane Portman, one of the talented writers on the new Amazon original series Tumble Leaf.  In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Portman about the concept behind Amazon's first original series for kids, the inspiration for the project, what he hopes viewers will take away from the show, and the multitude of other projects on which he is working!

This interview was conducted on June 1, 2014.

The Fanboy Comics staff and the creators behind the comic book series Penguins vs. Possums introduce the trade paperback that focuses on the epic and bizarre battle between the species.

This weekend belonged to Godzilla. I watched with rapt attention as he woke from hibernation, swam the Pacific Ocean, and battled the mighty, mating MOTU only to take a brief nap and then crash back under the waves, returning to the ocean depths from which he came.

What a stud, amirite? Sure, he knocks s--t over, but it’s all on the way to restore natural order to a world he arguably doesn’t have to care about. Some monsters just have altruistic motives to their city smashing, I guess. Whereas most others simply want to populate the earth and together crunch every skyline from here to Tokyo.

In that light, Godzilla has downright commendable character. I’d certainly buy the guy a drink.

“When you cease to fear death the rules of war change.”
     -- Shel-la

The narrative of the first season of DS9, and it’s a point I’ve made over and over and will likely continue to make, is the writers trying to understand the kinds of stories they can tell within the format of the show.  Eventually, they’ll learn that DS9 is the great paradox of Trek shows: to work within the format, they have to break that same format, and we’ll end up with some of the most bracing, fascinating, and, yes, dark storytelling the franchise has ever seen.  With this first season, the writers are stumbling around, flirting with various elements that will grow to define the series, and many that will get mercifully abandoned.  To their credit, they recognize when something is working and when something isn’t (Haven’t heard from Primmin lately, have we?), and developing the show in that direction.  This week’s episode, “Battle Lines,” is nearly recognizable as the series I love.

The following is an interview with Stuart Moore (Wolverine Noir, Stargate: Atlantis) and Bruce Zick (Thor, Atomic Legion), the creators of Mandala, the new trade paperback that was recently published by Dark Horse Comics.  In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Moore and Zick about the initial inspiration for the comic book series, the intricacy involved with creating the story's vast sci-fi world, their creative process of working together, and what's next for Mandala!

This interview was conducted on May 17, 2014.

“You think the whole galaxy is plotting around you, don’t you? Paranoia must run in your species, Odo. Maybe that’s why no one has ever seen another shapeshifter. They’re all hiding!”  -- Quark

It’s pretty easy to see why Odo was the first breakout character of the show.  It’s like they took a checklist of all the things guaranteed to connect with an audience and applied it to him.  Loner with a mysterious past? Check. Only one of his kind? Check. Cool powers? Check.  Gruff exterior masking a deep inner pain only curable with the love of a good woman? You better believe that’s a check.  It’s a wonder that more people didn’t grow up nursing an impossible Odo crush or wander around conventions wearing Team Odo shirts.  “Vortex,” the eleventh episode of the first season, once again turns the spotlight on our favorite grouchy ball of amber protoplasm, but instead of focusing solely on Odo’s preoccupation with justice, it tests that against the great unanswered question of his origin.

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